10-Yr Study On Tigers In Maharashtra (India).

10 year study tiger

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – Hindustan Times

10-Year Study Planned To Observe Changes In Maharashtra’s Tiger Habitat.

Content

With Maharashtra reporting a steady rise in its tiger population since 2006, the state forest department and the Wildlife Institute of India (WII) have planned a 10-year study to understand the changes in the animal’s habitat in the state. Titled “Long term research in the state of Maharashtra”, the study will also analyse populations of sloth bears, honey badgers and wild dogs in the state.

The Rs 19 crore study was approved last week by the technical committee of the National Tiger Conservation Authority (NTCA) and initial grants have been released by the Maharashtra government. “We are facing a problem of more tigers in certain pockets. It is important to know their dispersal pattern to strengthen wildlife corridors and reduce man-animal conflict over an extended time frame. The main intention is to give a boost to conservation,” said Nitin Kakodkar, principal chief conservator of forest (wildlife).

Commentary

The state forest department of Indian state Maharashtra and the Wildlife Institute of India (WII) have planned a 10-year study to understand the changes in the animal’s habitat in the state.

Although its motives are plausible it is unacceptable that tigers are being collared to track its whereabouts.

Not only because of security of the tiger (poacher can easily hack the frequency and thus track the tiger) but also because of animal rights.

Tigers should not be tagged or collared as it should be left alone in its own habitat. Like it is normal with people in a free world – they are also free from tags or collars.