The Truth Behind Tiger Census 2018: Smaller Tiger Populations Gone Extinct.

Tiger census

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‚ÄčIndia – India Today

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Decoding Tiger Census 2018: WII Scientist Explains Method, Talks About The Smaller Tiger Populations Gone Extinct.

Content

On International Tiger Day 2019, July 29, PM Narendra Modi released the tiger estimation figures in India and said that the country had achieved its target of doubling its number of tigers an incredible four years earlier than the given deadline. Now, India has 2,967 tigers – a reported growth of 33% in the fourth cycle of the Tiger Census which has been conducted every four years since 2006.

In 2006, the census showed that the number of tigers in India was only 1,411. In the next cycle of 2010, the numbers grew to 1,706, and in 2014, the tiger numbers grew to 2,226.

As per the Tiger Census of 2018, the state of Madhya Pradesh has the highest number of tigers at 526. It is followed by Karnataka with 524 tigers and Uttarakhand at 442 tigers. However, the states of Chhattisgarh and Mizoram saw a decline in tiger numbers while Odisha maintained its population.

PM Modi said that today, India was one of the safest habits for tigers in the world. But is the picture really this rosy?

Commentary

Excellent interview with Yadvendradev Jhala , scientist with the Wildlife Institute of India, responisble for the executing of the recent tiger census in India.

It shows how the census was done (the methods used) but also that the NTCA is still failing in many areas.