Indian tiger numbers

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – The Hindu

Experts question tiger numbers.

Content

India’s tiger numbers have come under the scanner as experts, including wildlife scientist Ullas Karanth, have questioned the enumeration methodology in a new paper published in a scientific journal.

India reported a 33% increase in the number of tigers in the wild in July this year, and the total tiger population was pegged at 2,967, a third more than the 2014 enumeration.

Commentary

Well-known scientists doubt the tiger numbers from the latest All India Tiger Census and call for a drastic revision of the current way of counting tigers.

Not only the current way of counting tigers is inaccurate, it is also a waste of tax payers money.

Let’s call for a national discussion.

#tiger #tigernews

Madhya Pradesh tiger

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – Hindustran Times

Alarm bells after 11 tiger deaths in Madhya Pradesh this year.

Content

Madhya Pradesh has recorded the highest tiger deaths— at least 11—in the first 10 months of a year in five years, according to state forest department officials.

The deaths have alarmed officials as Madhya Pradesh this year reemerged as the state with the highest number of tigers in the country after eight years.

According to the 2018 All India Tiger Estimation report released in July, Madhya Pradesh had 526 tigers followed by Karnataka (524). Officials said that the report has boosted tourism in the state

Commentary

Indian state Madhya Pradesh has shown beautiful tiger numbers at the last tiger census.

But the flipside of the coin is that in the first 10 months of 2019 already at least 11 tiger deaths were recorded. Electrocution, poaching, poisoning, territorial fights.

Sad but true.
And a call for more action.

#tiger #tigernews

Maharashtra tiger

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – The Tribune

More tigers die in Maharashtra even as their population doubled.

Content

Touted as a success story in tiger conservation after the population of the big cat doubled in Maharashtra between 2010 and 2019, the state has seen a big spike in their deaths over the past few years.

According to information available from the National Tiger Conservation Authority sourced by the Maharashtra forest department, Maharashtra lost 14 tigers in the whole of 2017 and 20 in 2018. 

The death toll of the feline in the nine months of this year is already 17, according to sources. Officials say, most of the deaths are caused by natural causes. Around five of the tiger deaths this year have been caused by poaching, say officials. 

“The number of tigers dying in accidents is also increasing as a number of infrastructure projects are being taken up near the tiger reserves,” says a forest department official.

 

Commentary

Despite doubling its number of tigers Indian state Maharashtra witnessed an increase in tiger deaths.

More poaching, electrocuting by farmers (also poaching) and more and more infrastructural projects near the tiger reserves are the main causes.

#tiger #tigernews

Two Amur tiger cubs

Original source, credits text and photograph

Russia – The Siberian Times

Double joy as two new cubs of endangered Amur tiger registered in the Far East of Russia.

Content

Two healthy cubs – a male and a female – were pictured running along forest paths and following their mother at the Bolshekhekhtsirsky Nature Reserve.

Last time one of the world’s rarest big cats lived in this area of Khabarovsk region was in 2007.

Several years ago a young Amur tigress was first noticed in the area, and recently the team of the reserve was overjoyed to receive proof that she delivered two cubs.

‘Photo trap pictures confirmed it was a male and a female cub. They look healthy and very well-fed, with the female staying close to mother and the male being noticeably more independent.

Commentary

Wonderful News!

In a nature reserve in Khabarovsk (Russia) where no tigers were seen in the last 12 years, two young sub-adult tigers were captured with cameras.

It’s always great to see!

#tiger #tigernews

Tiger stress

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – Quartz

What’s stressing out tigers in India’s central reserves? Tourists.

Content

Ever wondered how tigers feel in response to hordes of vehicles ferrying tourists eager for the thrill of a perfect close-up encounter?

Now, a study examining stress hormones in tiger scat collected from two popular central Indian tiger reserves has revealed that these iconic carnivores suffer from high levels of physiological stress due to wildlife tourism and a large number of vehicles entering the parks.

Commentary

Research shows that tigers get significantly higher stress levels from tourists.

This has a negative effect on growth, reproductive success, immunity, and it causes muscular atrophy.

The NTCA, the Indian tiger authority and the forest departments of all 50 tiger reserves in India have work to do!

#tiger #tigernews

Tiger numbers India

Original source, credits text and photograph

USA – Nature

India’s tigers seem to be a massive success story — many scientists aren’t sure.

Content

The Maruti Gypsy 44 sped along a jungle track, jolting us out of our seats. We had signed up for a wolf safari, but the trip leader had another quarry in mind. The vehicle barrelled towards a pungent smell on a hillside — a fresh tiger kill.

The forest guide spoke to one of his colleagues in a different vehicle and then barked at our driver to rush towards a nearby meadow. A tigress and four cubs are at a watering hole just beyond our sights, he said.

Commentary

Tiger numbers are going up in India. But behind this apparent success is a mist of intransparency and a cloud of tangible problems.

This excellent article reveals the doubts on the current policy of Indian tiger conservation and offers a good insight on what needs to be done to improve.

#tiger #tigernews

tiger academician Ma Jianzhang

Original source, credits text and photograph

China – Xinhua Net

Legend of China's "tiger academician" .

Content

Dubbed “tiger academician”, Ma Jianzhang, the 82-year-old academician of China Engineering Academy, had his first encounter with wild Siberian tiger in 1960s, which opened a new chapter in his career focusing on the study of the endangered species.

From 2013 to 2018, wild individual Siberian tigers have been observed a total of 57 to 62 times in China, compared to 12 to 16 tigers in 2000.

In 2017, China established its first national park for Siberian tigers and Amur leopards. Spanning an area of over 1.46 million hectares in the provinces of Jilin and Heilongjiang, the park is scheduled to be completed in 2020.

Commentary

One of China’s leading tiger conservationists is the 82-year old Ma Jianzhang.

He is interviewed in this article, which gives rare insights on Chinese tiger conservation.

#tiger #tigernews

Sundarbans buffer zone tiger numbers

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – Times of India

Buffer-zone count makes Sunderbans tiger roar.

Content

The Indian Sunderbans’ healthy increase in tiger count is mainly because of an unprecedented — almost unbelievable — more-than-fourfold jump in big cat number outside the tiger reserve area.

A detailed analysis of the tiger status report, 2018 — a quadrennial exercise — has revealed that the Indian Sunderbans logged a 16% growth in big cat population.

The numbers are better this time but it is important to look beyond numbers. Some long-term problems remain and they need to be tackled if we are to have a healthy, sustainable Sunderbans.

Commentary

With the last count of tigers India noticed that the Indian part of the Sundarbans hosted more tigers in the buffer zones compared with the latest count.

#tiger #tigernews

Veeru tiger

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – ANI

Veeru, a 3-year-old tiger died in the Sewai Madhopur area of Rajasthan.

Content

Veeru ‘ a three-year-old tiger , who died of critical injuries sustained in a territorial fight last week with another tiger, was given its last rites by the staff of the Ranthambore Tiger Reserve at the Aama Ghat here on Friday.

The tiger T-109 or Veeru was discovered in a severely injured and dehydrated state on September 30, after it scuffled with another tiger in the forest allegedly over forest territory.

Commentary

Veeru was a 3 year old tiger in Ranthambore. He died after a territorial fight with another tiger.

Ranthambore Tiger Reserve will face many more of these territorial fights, as well as increasing human tiger conflicts.

The reason for this is that conservation of tigers has become too succesful with many offspring. Now more than 70 tigers live in an area where only 50 could live.

Many people and businesses were (and still are) coming to the area because of the success. Because of this (new born) tigers can’t move away to get into new habitats.

The government of Indian state Rajasthan knows this but refuses to take effevtive action.

#tiger #tigernews

Nepalese tiger cub

Original source, credits text and photograph

United Kingdom – BBC Discover Wildlife

Title

Content

Nepal’s wild tigers increased to 235 in 2018 from only 121 in 2008 due to the conservation efforts of dedicated local people, the Nepali government and Zoological Society of London (ZSL).

ZSL has been working with communities in Nepal to ensure the survival of the country’s wild tigers for nearly 25 years, empowering and supporting people that live alongside these endangered big cats on the borderlands of the country’s national parks.

Commentary

Nepal is one of the few countries that is making real progress in conservation of nature.

Appreciation goes out to the Nepalese government, that has shown true leadership in making conservation work, in partnership with many small and big NGOs, like ZSL.

#tiger #tigernews

Amur pixel tiger

Original source, credits text and photograph

United Kingdom – Unilad

Photos Of Species Made Up Of As Many Pixels As There Are Animals Still Alive.

Content

Population by Pixel, shows how close animals are to extinction by how pixelated they are. The images are made up of as many pixels as there are animals left of that particular species.

It was created by agency Hakuhodo C&D / Tokyo and was the brainchild of creative directors Nami Hoshino, Yoshiyuki Mikami, and designer Kazuhiro Mochizuki.

Commentary

What happens if you create a photograph of wild animals based on their numbers?

This article shows how photographs look like if their resolution in pixels is in accordance with their numbers in the wild.

#tiger #tigernews

Tiger numbers

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – The Telegraph

Whistle-blower Slams Numbers.

Content

India’s tiger conservation programme should shed its obsession with numbers, a researcher instrumental in reviving the big cat population in a Madhya Pradesh forest asserted in Calcutta on Wednesday.

The National Tiger Conservation Authority’s 2018 tiger census report was released by Prime Minister Narendra Modi on July 29. The report showed that the number of tigers in the wild in India has grown to 2,967, a 33 per cent rise since the last count in 2014, which had recorded 2,226 tigers. The rise in the big cat count triggered euphoria.

But conservation biologist Raghunandan Singh Chundawat had a word of caution. “My sarcastic joke is that if the PM had not been releasing it, then what would have been the figure,” he told the audience at Rotary Sadan on Wednesday.

Commentary

The counting of tigers gets too much emphasis, according to a ‘whistle blower’.

We can only agree that it takes the focus away of what really needs to be done!

#tiger #tigernews

Tiger carcass

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – The Sentinel

Carcass Of Royal Bengal Tigress Recovered At Kohora Range In Kaziranga National Park.

Content

A carcass of a Royal Bengal Tigress was recovered at Kaziranga National Park.

The decomposed body of a Tigress was found in the Lengta camp area of under Kohora range on Friday. The animal is suspected to have died nearly 6 days ago.

“The dead animal was a matured female. Symptoms suggest that it had died due to infighting with another tiger,” Robindra Sharma, research officer KNP, said.

A post mortem examination carried out by experts verified infighting as the cause of death. The carcass was later burnt in the presence of forest officials.

Commentary

Another dead tigress was found in India, now in Kaziranga Narional Park in Assam.

A research officer said that the symptoms suggest that she was killed by another tiger.

#tiger #tigernews

Tiger numbers 2019

Tiger Numbers 2019 - Devil In Disguise.

Content

(Rotterdam, The Netherlands) – 25th of September 2019

After praising India for showing great results in tiger conservation, the new number of wild tigers has been revised to 4642, based on available data, said Chris Slappendel, founder of the IATA Tiger News Platform.

The new numbers are compiled from the latest national tiger surveys, IUCN data and realistic estimations from reliable sources. Compared with 2010 – a major moment in tiger history when in St. Petersburg (Russia) countries, NGOs, IGOs committed to doubling the amount of tigers to 6,400 – this new number of wild tigers is a big step forward. The current increase can be attributed to the fast growing tiger population in India. However, the rising numbers distract from what is really happening on ground level.

“Since 2010 we see the same things happening as before. Agriculture (palm oil), mining and encroachment are leading to destruction of tiger habitat. International operating crime syndicates are inducing the Chinese demand for tigers and tiger products, and use tiger farms to deliver the supply while fuelling the demand for tigers in the wild. Unsustainable tourism is expanding with more exploitation of tigers in captivity and more unwanted situations in and around tiger reserves,” said Frederic Geffroy, founder of Planete Tigre, a tiger NGO in France, with almost nine hundred thousand worried followers.

The situation of tigers has worsened if looked beyond the new numbers. Cambodia, Vietnam and Laos failed in executing the plans agreed during the St. Petersburg Tiger Summit, resulting in a situation where tigers are ‘functionally extinct’. Malaysia expects to announce the results of their recent census soon but an estimated number of 200 tigers shows that Malaysia has lost around 60 (!) per cent of its tigers since 2010. Myanmar’s tiger population suffers greatly from domestic instability, with a growing influence of wildlife trade hubs serving mainly Chinese customers, as well as in Laos and Vietnam.

The situation in Sumatra (Indonesia) is a mystery. In 2010 a number of 325 tigers was presented but this appeared to be an estimated guess. Like Malaysia, Indonesia invested heavily in palm oil development in recent years, resulting in an ongoing destruction of tiger habitat. Sources on the ground however indicate that, at this moment, the real number of tigers is closer to 500. So while the situation has worsened, the ‘official’ number of tigers will grow when the results of the next census of Sumatran tigers will be presented.

Even in an apparently successful country like India, things are not what they seem. While the census shows a great success, the reality is that India has the most human-tiger conflicts, the most seized tiger products and the highest poaching numbers of all tiger range countries, according to the recently published report of TRAFFIC, an international watchdog on wildlife crime. The government of India has received also lots of criticism on the methods used with the latest tiger census.

“What we can learn from the last nine years is that not all governments are reliable when it comes to tiger conservation. This needs to change drastically. The world needs a governing vehicle that can step up when things don’t go according to plan, like in Vietnam, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia and Cambodia. The UN seems to be the most logical organization but the UN needs to see tiger conservation as a priority. The World Bank, key-initiator of the St. Petersburg Tiger Summit, left the stage without a decent transfer of its role and commitment. CITES is only interested in regulating the trade and is generally considered as a ‘paper tiger’. Next to the UN there is only one organization that can do it, which is WWF. But unfortunately WWF is under constant questioning and criticism from lots of other NGOs,” says Slappendel who refers to the new numbers as a devil in disguise.

“People who read that the numbers are going up, really think it’s getting better. But it is not. Despite all the help of NGOs, volunteers, law enforcers and all others that work hard to make a better world for tigers. If we want to save tigers, the world needs to do more”, Slappendel concludes.

Commentary

Now India has released its new tiger numbers, we now can say that the new total number of tigers in the wild has increased to 4642 tigers.

Although we’re extremely thankful with this development, we’re very worried at the same time. The situation of tigers outside of Bhutan, India, Nepal, and Russia is either unknown or just poor, just because governments are not keeping their promises.

The new tiger number of 4,642 is therefore not representing what’s really happening on ground level. We call it a devil in disguise.

We call for much more action, not only from the tiger range countries but from all other countries, international organizations, people and companies – especially the companies that now use a tiger in its brand or marketing without doing anything to save tigers.

#tiger #tigernews

Frederic Geffroy, Planete Tigre

Frederic Geffroy

Founding president of Planete Tigre, a French NGO.

Chris Slappendel

Chris Slappendel

Founder of the IATA Tiger News platform and chairperson of the Wildlife Advocates Foundation, a Dutch NGO.

tiger census
Original source, credits text and photograph
India – Times of India

Photo credits: Deccan Herald

No Glitches In Tiger Estimation Numbers, Claims WII.

Content

Scientists of the Wildlife Institute of India (WII) as well as officials of Corbett Tiger Reserve (CTR) on Friday reacted to a media report which alleged that there were glitches in the tiger estimation exercise of 2015 conducted by WII and National Tiger Conservation Authority.

The exercise had counted 2,226 tigers and photographed 1,635 but it was alleged that 221 of these “tiger photos” — or around 16% of the numbers — should not have been counted as it was found “after an analysis of the pictures that one of seven could be a paper tiger photographed twice; in some cases even thrice; photos repeated, and photos repeated but shown as that of different tigers in the data set.”

YV Jhala, senior scientist of WII and principal investigator of the tiger estimation report said that “there is no question of duplicating or inflating the numbers as we still have the data and albums very much saved with us.”

Commentary

Yadvendra Yhala of the Wildlife Institute of India (a governmental agency) denies the supposed glitches in tiger censuses.

He says the contrary is true: that the numbers are even under-reported.

On the other hand, the WII is fueling speculation by being not transparent on the process and the findings.

The question is: why?

#tiger #tigernews

Tiger census

Original source, credits text and photograph

United Kingdom – The Telegraph

Paper Tigers: India's Big Cat Surveys 'Over Reporting Numbers'.

Content

Surveys of India’s tiger population that have cheered conservationists by reporting sharp rises in numbers may have exaggerated, an investigation claims.

The survey team may have double-counted scores of tigers by misinterpreting camera trap photographs, according to an analysis of the counting method.

Commentary

A survey of Indian Express on the 2015 tiger census in India shows that mistakes were made, leading to an over-counting of as much as 16 per cent.

With the already existing doubt with tiger experts on the census of 2018 this new survey fuels the discussion on the transparency and the accountability of tiger censuses in India.

#tiger #tigernews

chattisgarh tiger

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – The New Indian Express

Tiger Population In Chhattisgarh Has Dwindled By 59% Since 2014, Says Study.

Content

Chhattisgarh’s performance on tiger conservation management has been miserable as the big cat population has dwindled by 59% since 2014, revealed the official findings.

The state forest department didn’t hesitate to admit that the situation is really depressing.

The state lagged behind other states in effectively implementing the management framework for tiger conservation.

Commentary

Cchatttisgarh is performing poor in tiger conservation in comparison with other Indian reserves.

How can we help to improve their performance?

 

#tiger #tigernews

Odisha tiger

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – News Click

Odisha’s Tiger Population Static for 4 Years as Rampant Poaching and Loss of Prey Base Continues.

Content

Despite the availability of vast forests, the rampant poaching of prey base and tigers has taken a heavy toll on the prized feline population in Odisha. The tiger population has remained static at 28 in the last four years.

While the all India results of 2,967 tigers in 2018 compared with 2,226 tigers in 2014 have brought cheer to tiger lovers, the Odisha count remaining static at 28 has become a cause of grave concern as the coastal state has not been able to add a single tiger in four years.

Questions are being raised on what happened to the new born tigers who are more than 1 year old since the census ignores tiger cubs less than a year old as their survival is uncertain.

Commentary

Tiger numbers in Odisha are static for four years, though they should increase. That’s strange.

Especially if the field director says that it is normal for the tiger population to remain static and is hopeful of rising numbers in the future. “We have stopped poaching that is why the numbers are not declining and it is static. The numbers will grow in due course”.

“I am here for the last three months and have sighted leopards only. I have not sighted any tiger yet as the Simlipal forest is a difficult terrain,” the field director said, adding that there is no shortage of prey as the forest has adequate number of deer and sambar.

So if there is enough prey, the poaching has stopped: how come that tigers are disappearing?

Wake up NTCA and State government!

#tiger #tigernews

Sundarbans tiger

Original source, credits text and photograph

Bangladesh – UNB (United News of Bangladesh)

Sundarbans Tigress Wasn’t Killed By Poachers: Investigators.

Content

A tigress, found dead in Sundarbans East Zone on August 20, was not killed by poachers, investigators have confirmed.

But the probe body, formed by the Forest Department, is yet to specify the cause of death. The three-member committee submitted its report to the Divisional Forest Officer on Monday night, said probe body chief Md Joynal Abedin.

Commentary

The cause of death of the dead tiger found in the Sundarbans in Bangladesh is still not determined.

A first look showed the tiger was not killed by poachers.

The results of the post-mortem will be released in the first week of september.

#tiger #tigernews

Munna tiger

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – The Wire

How The Tiger Census Estimated India Now Has 2,967 Tigers.

Content

We were pleased to hear last month that the country’s tiger population has risen by 33% since 2014, signalling that tiger conservation is on the right track. We also need to be thankful to all those well-meaning critics across society who had cautioned in the late 1990s that tigers would go extinct from India by the turn of the 21st century unless the government took some urgent and bold steps. With 2,967 tigers, India now supports around 80% of the tigers occurring in the 13 Asia-Pacific tiger-range countries.

The new tiger estimation method has greatly evolved since it was first used in 2006, and is now more scientifically and statistically defensible, using contemporary animal abundance-assessment methodologies. Surveyors complemented this with a large number of camera-traps, GPS trackers and range-finders. This way, apart from counting tigers, surveyors have also estimated the populations of a number of co-predators and ungulate species throughout the country.

Commentary

Indian wildlife conservationists keep discussing the used method with the recent tiger census – also because it included one year old tigers instead of 1,5 year olds.

This last addition can lead to an extra increase in tiger numbers, making the claim of doubling the tigers doubtful

We all wait for the moment the organisor of the All Indian Census 2018 – Wildlife Institute of India (WII) – will release the detailed report.

#tiger #tigernews

Chandrapur tiger

Original source, credits text and photograph

Yahoo News

Tiger Found Dead In Maharashtra's Chandrapur.

Content

A tiger was found dead in Gondpipri Tehsil of Chandrapur municipality of Maharashtra on night of August 24. The reason for the death of the wild animal is yet to be ascertained. Authorities are expected to initiate an investigation to find the reasons behind the death of the tiger.

Commentary

Another tiger dead, now in Gondpipri Tehsil of Chandrapur municipality of Indian state Maharashtra.

The cause of death is unscertain and under investigation.

It goes on and on.

#tiger #tigernews

Bangladesh tiger

Original source, credits text and photograph

Bangladesh – The Daily Star

Tiger Poaching On Rise.

Content

More than three tigers were poached in Bangladesh every year over the last four years, according to a report published by TRAFFIC, a UK-based international non-profit working on trade in wildlife and plants.

Although Bangladesh has only a few tigers in the Sundarbans, the trend of poaching for tiger skin, teeth, bones, skulls, and other parts of tiger body is increasing, said the report published on Wednesday.

It said 51 tigers were killed over the last 20 years and the average for 2015-18 is 3.1 tigers, which is a lot higher than that of 2000-2014 when it was 2.0.

Commentary

TRAFFIC, an international NGO that monitors the wildlife trade, came with a report, claiming that Bangladesh lost 3,1 tigers on average during the last 19 years – which is a lot higher than that of 2000-2014 when it was 2.0.

Officials concerned in Bangladesh, however, denied TRAFFIC’s claims and said poaching numbers and seizures of tiger body parts were reducing.

Do these officials know that Bangladesh had 440 tigers in the 2010 count and now only have 114?

Sundarbans tiger

Original source, credits text and photograph

Bangladesh – Daily Star

Bengal Tiger Found Dead In Sundarbans.

Content

The forest officials have recovered body of a Bengal Tiger from Chaprakhali of Sharankhola range of eastern Sundarbans.

Some forest guards found the body of a tigress lying on the land while they were patrolling the area in the forest yesterday, said Mahmudul Hasan, divisional forest officer of eastern Sundarbans today.

Commentary

Tiger found dead by forest guards in the Bangladesh side of the Sundarbans.

The cause of death is unknown – no marks were found on the body.

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – The Hindu

Crouching Tiger, Hidden Data.

Content

The fourth national tiger survey has generated much euphoria, whereas the first one in 2006 had cast a pall of gloom. However, missing from all the four survey reports are details necessary to assess the reliability of the tiger numbers.

A brief history of India’s tiger censuses can shed some light on this issue. The tradition of reporting tiger numbers dates back to the 1970s. These numbers were based on the ‘pugmark census method’, which simple-mindedly assumed that the pugmarks of every tiger could be found, recognised and tallied.

As scientific critiques showed, these assumptions failed, rendering the numbers meaningless. However, the forest bureaucracy (the Ministry of Environment and allied institutions) ignored the problem for decades.

Commentary

India recently announced beautiful new tiger numbers. But since then the comments on the report and the real situation of Indian tiger conservancy are growing.

One of the main criticisms is about the used methodology. A beautiful video, even with the great and respected Sir David Attenborough starring, about explaining how India counted tigers now seems more and more as a decoy for the way India actually counted tigers.

This article shows that the Indian Government (Project Tiger – National Tiger Conservation Authority) is blocking any attempts to give insights on the counting itself.

It raises a lot of suspicion – fueled by comments of renown ecological statistical experts.

What has India to hide?

Tigers Count

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – Deccan Chronicle

More To Tigers Than Numbers.

Content

The latest report on tiger population is music to ears for conservationists in Kerala.

Officially, the country has doubled its tiger population in just over a decade — from a precarious 1,411 in 2006 to 2,967 in 2018.

India now has more than 75 per cent of the globe’s tigers trotting in the wild. The feel-good is justified as the national animal is faring well in most of the tiger range states despite several odds.

In Kerala, the population of big cats increased from 136 in 2014 to 190 in 2018.

Commentary

The chief forest conservator in Indian state Kerala (Pramod Krishnan) wants to express his pride for the Kerala tiger reserves.

On the other hand it distracts from the plausible points he is making on the future of Indian tiger reserves.

So please read and just look through the bragging about Kerala.

Odisha tiger

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – Odisha Bytes

Claws Out On Big Cat Count In Odisha.

Content

The recent tiger census showed a sorry figure for Odisha. While tiger numbers have increased in the country to 2,967 at present from 1,411 in 2006, there has been a decrease in Odisha

In 2002, there were 192 tigers in Similipal. Today, there are 28 tigers left in Odisha, according to the Ministry of Environment and Forest. This number has sparked a debate and the state government has decided to contest the census claim by doing its own survey.

Tigers were historically counted by pug-mark method — a technique invented in Odisha. Today, it is aided by camera-trap technology for more accurate estimation, explained Dr Biswajit Mohanty, Chairman of Greenpeace India.

 

 

Commentary

The numbers of tigers in Indian state Odisha are down, leading to finger pointing.
 
One points out to the methodology: the way of counting tigers must be wrong. Another points out that the protection of tigers is just a mess.

Bangla tiger

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – India Blooms

Low Male Tiger Population In Bangladesh, Worrisome: Official.

Content

A lower-than-expected population of male Royal Bengal tigers in the world’s largest mangrove forest has sparked fears about the long-term viability of the endangered species in Bangladesh, officials said here.

A poaching crackdown by authorities in the Bangladeshi part of Sundarbans mangroves saw an increase in the big cat population from 106 to 114 four years ago, according to a census published in May.

However, closer analysis of the data found that the number of male tigers was lower than the typical ratio of one male for every three tigresses, with the figure now at one male for every five females, officials said here on Wednesday.

Commentary

The male-female ratio of tigers in the Sundarbans in Bangladesh is getting to a critical point – with even a 10 percent count in the Sharonkhola range (2 out of 19).

The future of the tiger population in the Sundarbans could be at stake, if the forest continues to lose male tigers.

Tibet tiger

Original source, credits text and photograph

China, XinhuaNet

Signs Of Bengal Tigers Spotted In SW China.

Content

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Commentary

Good news from Tibet: tigers spotted!
 
The Authorities with the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) have spotted signs of Bengal tigers in what the Chinese say southwest China’s Tibet Autonomous Region.
 
The tigers were spotted already in January with one of the 48 camera traps installed.

Tiger census

Original source, credits text and photograph

​India – India Today

Decoding Tiger Census 2018: WII Scientist Explains Method, Talks About The Smaller Tiger Populations Gone Extinct.

Content

On International Tiger Day 2019, July 29, PM Narendra Modi released the tiger estimation figures in India and said that the country had achieved its target of doubling its number of tigers an incredible four years earlier than the given deadline. Now, India has 2,967 tigers – a reported growth of 33% in the fourth cycle of the Tiger Census which has been conducted every four years since 2006.

In 2006, the census showed that the number of tigers in India was only 1,411. In the next cycle of 2010, the numbers grew to 1,706, and in 2014, the tiger numbers grew to 2,226.

As per the Tiger Census of 2018, the state of Madhya Pradesh has the highest number of tigers at 526. It is followed by Karnataka with 524 tigers and Uttarakhand at 442 tigers. However, the states of Chhattisgarh and Mizoram saw a decline in tiger numbers while Odisha maintained its population.

PM Modi said that today, India was one of the safest habits for tigers in the world. But is the picture really this rosy?

Commentary

Excellent interview with Yadvendradev Jhala , scientist with the Wildlife Institute of India, responisble for the executing of the recent tiger census in India.

It shows how the census was done (the methods used) but also that the NTCA is still failing in many areas.

Chhattisgarh TIGER RESERVE

Original source, credits text and photograph

The Indian Express

Title

Content

In the good news held out by the tiger census, one glaring black mark was Chhattisgarh, where the numbers have dropped to less than half — from 46 in 2014 to an estimated 19 in the 2018 audit. The state has three tiger reserves, Achanakmar, Udanti-Sitanadi and Indravati. While in the case of Indravati, officials can cite the reserve’s location — enumeration comes with challenges in Naxal-hit South Bastar’s Bijapur — for the low numbers, NTCA sources say the bigger reason is the lack of any core protected area in any of the three reserves, spread over 4,159 sq km.

Commentary

The Indian state of Chhattisgarh is a dark page in the recent tiger revival in India – with less than half of the tigers of the 2014 census.