Extinction risk reduces 40% with sustainable farming and forestry

Extinction risk reduces 40% with sustainable farming and forestry. Sustainable timber and crop production will address some of the biggest drivers of wildlife decline. This finding comes from STAR, a new tool. STAR allows companies, governments and civil society to accurately measure their progress in stemming global species loss.…

Vaccine could save critical tiger population

In 2003 a young Amur tiger, seeming disoriented, wandered into a Russian village on the Chinese border. Wildlife Conservation Society scientists anesthetized the tiger and determined that she had canine distemper—the first case confirmed in a wild tiger. The feline patient zero died six weeks later.

Since then, canine distemper, an…

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Study reveals secret lives of tigers

A new study finds that tiger mothers in the Russian Far East tend to be stay-at-home moms, and when it comes time for kids to move out, they sometimes let a few of them hang around at home.

Publishing their results in the journal Mammal Research, researchers with the Wildlife Conservation…

Increasingly fragmented tiger populations may require ‘genetic rescue,’ Stanford researchers say

Despite being one of the world’s most charismatic species, tigers face uncertain futures primarily due to habitat fragmentation, human-wildlife conflict and poaching. As global tiger populations decline, so does their genetic diversity. But until now it’s been unclear how the animals’ dwindling numbers are affecting them at the genetic level.

To…