tiger academician Ma Jianzhang

Original source, credits text and photograph

China – Xinhua Net

Legend of China's "tiger academician" .

Content

Dubbed “tiger academician”, Ma Jianzhang, the 82-year-old academician of China Engineering Academy, had his first encounter with wild Siberian tiger in 1960s, which opened a new chapter in his career focusing on the study of the endangered species.

From 2013 to 2018, wild individual Siberian tigers have been observed a total of 57 to 62 times in China, compared to 12 to 16 tigers in 2000.

In 2017, China established its first national park for Siberian tigers and Amur leopards. Spanning an area of over 1.46 million hectares in the provinces of Jilin and Heilongjiang, the park is scheduled to be completed in 2020.

Commentary

One of China’s leading tiger conservationists is the 82-year old Ma Jianzhang.

He is interviewed in this article, which gives rare insights on Chinese tiger conservation.

#tiger #tigernews

Hans Dalal tiger

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – Condé Nast Traveller

Battling demons, saving tigers: the story of Hans Dalal.

Content

“Spotting a tiger in the wild for the first time can leave even the most jaded of us speechless. Some grown men have even shed a tear or two,” says Hans Dalal, a man of many talents.

He’s a sound engineer, a wildlife photographer and conservationist–vocations few would naturally associate with someone born with cerebral palsy.

Far from relying on others for help, Hans is out in the wild, saving its beautiful creatures. 

Commentary

Hans Dalal was born with Cerebral Palsy and his mom was told that he may never walk in his life. But she refused to believe that.

Her strength and Hans his strength helped to overcome his handicap and to grow in life.

Hans is a sound engineer, a wildlife photographer and with his partner he runs an NGO to save tigers.

#tiger #tigernews

Bal Kumari Mahatwo tiger

Original source, credits text and photograph

USA – Global Press Journal

In Nepal, Government, Community Collaboration Boosts Wild Tiger Population

Content

Bal Kumari Mahatwo, 34, sells everything from hand cream to biscuits at the general store in her village. She is also a tailor who makes bamboo handicrafts in her spare time.

But even with all of those duties, Mahatwo also finds time once a week for a potentially dangerous pursuit.

She and several other volunteers spend three to five hours patrolling an area called a buffer zone of the Chitwan National Park, a wildlife reserve and Nepal’s first national park, near Nepal’s southern border. She’s patrolling to prevent poachers from hunting wild animals, including rhinos and tigers, and to rescue wild animals that have wandered into nearby villages.

Commentary

Nepal has been an inspiration for tiger conservationists for many years already.

This example of the collaboration between the government and communities shows again why.

#tiger #tigernews

Unknown heroes

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – Outlook

In Kaziranga, Forest Guard Shantiram Chhetri Stands Between Poacher's Bullets And Rhinos.

Content

Kaziranga is one park in India, which, like the African savannah, will spoil you silly. It boasts of the presence of its own big five: Rhino, Asiatic water Buffalo, Elephant, Swamp Deer and of course the Tiger. The tiger will play elusive but the others are easy to spot.

The national park is blessed with an abundance of wildlife, and it is this very fact that has now become its weakness.

Such abundance can be taken for granted only at great peril and cost.

Commentary

Forest guards are often alone, in dangerous situations and underpaid. And above all: undervalued.

Meet Shanti Ram Cchetri, forest guard in Kaziranga National Park.

#tiger #tigernews

Stars and stripes tiger

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – The Indian Express

Stars And Stripes.

Content

There were two momentous news items in the media recently regarding wildlife: One, the number of tigers in the country has gone up, and two, no less than the Prime Minister was taken around Corbett National Park by the renowned survivalist, Bear Grylls. Down in Jungleland (DIJ) conducted an interview with an official spokestiger regarding both these issues and some more. Excerpts:

DIJ: Congratulations — you guys have really scored well in these last few years. It just shows that all those gloom and doom stories being peddled by the media (present company excluded, of course) were baseless.Your comment?

Tiger: Just remember, there are 1.3 billion of you — our most dangerous enemy — pitted against maybe 3,000 of us maximum. You figure the odds. Each one of us has to deal with 3,33,333.333 of you. No tiger can eat so much, even if it were born and brought up at McDonald’s.

Commentary

Funny interview with a tiger, down in jungleland.

#tiger #tigernews

Avni cub freed

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – Hindustan Times

Avni’s Female Cub To Be Released Into The Wild After Monsoon.

Content

The female cub (T1C2) of tigress Avni, shot dead last year by a hunter who did not have the permission to shoot the big cat blamed for killing 13 people in Maharashtra’s Yavatmal, will be released in the wild in November. The cub will be mature enough by then to take care of herself, state forest department and National Tiger Conservation Authority (NTCA) officials said.

Officials said tiger cubs generally stay with their mothers at least till they are 18 months old and then disperse into the wild in search of new territory. T1C2 was rescued a month after Avni was killed in November 2018 and kept in the Pench Tiger Reserve.

Commentary

Finally Avni lives on again. Her cub, taken from the wild one month after Avni was illegally killed, will be released in the wild again when she will be around two years old.

Although many questions still are open (what is happening with the idiot that killed Avni, what happened with T1C1 etc), it is great to know that the NTCA has given its approval to release Avni’s (female) cub.

The big question remains: what will be her name?

Mixed emotions tiger

Original source, credits text and photograph

USA – The Daily Beast

A Jungle Walk On Tiger Safari Is An Emotional Roller Coaster.

Content

Chinmay Deshpande pointed to a patch of wet brown earth. “See that?” said the naturalist with Pugdundee Safaris. He kneeled down to get a better look, and sniffed. The damp spot was urine from a tiger. He had peed right where we stood, on a leafy remote trail in India’s Satpura National Park, perhaps not an hour before. As for specifics, the tiger was almost certainly male because of his massive footprints, which were the size of dinner plates.

Judging by its fresh urine, the stealthy predator was probably still around, close by in the dense sal and teak forest.

Depending on your perspective, this was either fantastic—we might see a tiger in the wild as we crept in the jungle, as opposed to the usual perch of an open-air jeep.

Commentary

Feel good story of a writer walking in tiger territory and experiencing all kinds of emotions in Indian tiger reserves.