Sanjay tigress

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – NDTV

Tigress Found Dead In Madhya Pradesh Forest Reserve.

Content

The mutilated carcass of a tigress was found in Sanjay Tiger Reserve’s Khokra forest area at Madhyra Pradesh’s Sidhi, a forest official said on Thursday. Director of the reserve Ashok Mishra confirmed the death of T-20 tigress, but said the exact cause can be ascertained only after an autopsy.

According to a forest official, they were unable to track the location of the three-and-a-half-year-old tigress for the last one week.

Commentary

A translocated tigress from Panna Tiger Reserve in Indian state Madhya Pradesh was found dead in her new ‘home’ (Sanjay Tiger Reserve) after foresters lost track of her for more than a week.

The body was found heavy mutilated, together with the body of another animal.

An autopsy must ascertain the cause of death.

#tiger #tigernews

Karnataka tiger

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – WIO News

Growing tiger numbers leads to big cats spilling out of forests in Karnataka.

Content

In July 2019 India had reasons to cheer after the Prime Minister announced the All India Tiger Estimation results of 2018. In four years, India had seen an increase of 700 of these big cats. But with the growth in tiger population, bigger challenges now face the forest departments.

On October 13, a 4-day operation by the Karnataka Forest department led to the capture of a young tiger from around the Bandipur Tiger Reserve. The tiger had been tormenting villagers, by killing 2 people and over a dozen cattle. 6 veterinarians, multiple teams and forest department elephants identified the tiger using camera traps and pug marks and managed to tranquilise it.

But while the department has been lauded for capturing the big cat, the problems are bigger than that.

Commentary

Because Indian state Karnataka has been successful with tiger conservation some of the forests are filled with tigers.

So they go looking for other places, also entering human habitats. The result: increasing human-tiger conflicts.

The state of Karnataka refuses to expand the tiger areas in a real progressive way, getting more and citizens jeopardized by growing chances on human tiger conflicts.

#tiger #tigernews

80 km tiger journey

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – Star of Mysore

From Nagarahole to Bandipur: T-18’s 80-km journey.

Content

The tiger that was tranquillised and captured near Bandipur Tiger Reserve on Sunday is under close observation at the Chamundi Rescue and Rehabilitation Centre set up by Mysuru Zoo at Koorgalli on the outskirts of Mysuru. The middle-aged tiger is in a healthy condition, Forest Department officials said.

In a massive hunting operation lasting five days, the tiger was traced and captured on Sunday in the forest with the help of Soliga tribals, who are experts in hunting wild animals on foot.

The tiger remained elusive since Oct.9 after claiming farmer Shivappa as its second victim a day earlier and a month after mauling Shivamadaiah, another farmer to death inside the forest. It had also killed 14 cattle heads during the last two months.

Commentary

The Bandipur tiger was a young, sub-adult tiger that was looking for a new home, as it appears now.

T-18 was from Nagarahole, a tiger area some 80 kms from where it was captured. Because it needed a place to live, not able to fight with adult tigers, it most probably lived at the fringes of forests to avoid other tigers, where it could get easy prey too – before mating and setlling somewhere definitely.

#tiger #tigernews

Tiger homes

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – ScoopWhoop

In This Battle Of Environment Vs Development, Our Wildlife Is Losing The Fight For Their Homes.

Content

Human beings and wildlife have been co-existing on this planet for centuries. But recent instances of felling of trees in the name of development have put a question mark on the existence of wild animals.

Imagine someone encroaching on your home and destroying it to pieces. It feels terrible, right? Now think of what we are doing to forests and other protected areas where lakhs of wildlife species reside.

Commentary

If you wanna know how India is doing with its wildlife conservation, please read this article.

#tiger #tigernews

Ramgarh Vishdhari wildlife sanctuary

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – Times of India

Rajasthan all set to get fourth reserve for big cats.

Content

Rajasthan is poised to get its fourth tiger reserve with the forest department deliberating on upgrading the Ramgarh Vishdhari wildlife sanctuary. A proposal has been drafted and is likely to be sent to the chief wildlife warden this week for approval.

The upgrade in the status is expected to strengthen the ongoing tiger conservation efforts in the state. In 2013, the Rajasthan government had upgraded Mukundra hills sanctuary as the third tiger reserve.

The total area of 1017 sqkm that has been identified as the reserve area comprising two forest blocks of Bhilwara, territorial forest block of Bundi and Indargarh, which falls under buffer zone of Ranthambore Tiger Reserve (RTR).

Commentary

Good news: Indian stata Rajasthan will get a 4th tiger reserve!

This will be the Ramgarh Vishdhari Wildlife Sanctuary, including some other forests.

This is necessary because Rajasthan has a problem with tigers in Ranthambore. Due to the conservation success Ranthambore has too many tigers and they need to be relocated.

Keep up the good news India!

#tiger #tigernews

Bandipur tiger

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – The Hindu

Tiger caught in Bandipur won’t be released back into the wild: official.

Content

The Bandipur tiger tranquillised and shifted to Mysuru won’t be released back into the forest even though it is young and healthy.

This was stated by Principal Chief Conservator of Forests (Wildlife) Sanjai Mohan, who pointed out that since the big cat has killed a person, the authorities cannot take the risk of releasing it back into the wild.

Commentary

Principal Chief Conservator of Forests (Wildlife) Sanjai Mohan is unreliable.

Before the hunt of the Bandipur tiger the intention was to relocate the tiger.

But the second the tiger was captured he announces that the tiger will never be released back into the wild – because of ‘safety of people’.

Instead, look for possibilities. The reason the tiger started eating cows and dogs was because of the loss of a canine tooth – it needed easy prey and humans in the way of it were allegedly killed.

With all the science in the world: just give this tiger a new tooth. There must be plenty in the storage rooms, seized from all the tiger poachers.

And please: stop using elephants for hunting if you are true conservationists.

#tiger #tigernews

Bandipur tiger

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – Times of India

Prowling tiger captured in Karnataka's Bandipur.

Content

The tiger was injured in the head, ears and other parts The forest department tranquilised a nine-year-old tiger , which had created panic among villagers, near Hediyala , Nanjangud on Sunday.

The tiger had killed a cow in a village on the fringes of Bandipur Tiger Reserve. Some residents had spotted the tiger prowling near the village at night. As panic gripped the area, villagers demanded that the forest department capture the big cat.

The department personnel launched an operation to capture the tiger on Saturday. They placed cameras at various points near the village and at a cotton field, based on pug marks and information from villagers. Forest department personnel launch an operation to capture the tiger.

Forest department personnel take away the nine-year old male tiger after tranquilizing it.

Commentary

A tiger in India that has lost a tooth and couldn’t hunt anymore was hunted itself by more than 100 people in the Bandipur forests.

Because the tiger couldn’t hunt in the forest anymore, as the canine tooth was broken (crucial for tigers), this tiger went into farmland and villages for easy prey (dogs and cows).

While doing so this tiger (allegedly) also killed two humans.

The hunt for the tiger was successful after intervention of a local tribe, whose members spotted the tiger.

The tiger was tranquilized by a dart and is now in custody. As the tiger was very week thorough examinations will be done to see if it could be released back into the wild.

#tiger #tigernews

Tiger conservation

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – Mid-day.com

'Battle for conservation will be fought in our cities'.

Content

What lessons did research for Rewilding teach you?

For this book, I spent two years travelling to India’s most remote corners; sometimes alone, and at times, with my four-year-old. I covered places from Manas on the border with Bhutan to Orang (Sonitpur district, Assam) a lesser-known park but extremely vital habitat for the rhino and pygmy hog. When I finished my travels I came away with an immense sense of pride on how much we are doing to conserve our wildlife, but this hope sits on the precipice of concern. It takes so much hard work to restore an ecosystem or bring back a species and with just one nod from a decision maker, the same forest can be signed away for a dam or a road. Take the Panna example. While we have an army of forest guards on the ground to protect the tiger in this national park in Madhya Pradesh, we now want to drown the same habitat for a river-linking project. Never mind the millions of rupees that have gone in bringing back tigers to a park that lost all its big cats to poaching.

Commentary

Award-winning environmental journalist Bahar Dutt discusses a new book (Rewilding) that celebrates the lesser-known triumphs of conservation in India, Panna Tiger Reserve and the travesty of Aarey.

Nice interview!

#tiger #tigernews

Ranthambore tiger

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – Times of India

Cramped for space, Ranthambore tigers look for new homes.

Content

The number of tigers in Ranthambore Tiger Reserve (RTR) has increased to the point that the reserve can no longer sustain the big cats that are currently inhabiting the area. Rajasthan’s chief wildlife warden Arindam Tomar has put forward a proposal to the National Tiger Conservation Authority (NTCA), the apex tiger conservation body in the country, to shift the big cats to Mukundra Hills Tiger Reserve (MHTR), Sariska Tiger Reserve (STR) and Ramgarh Vishdhari Wildlife Sanctuary in Bundi.

Speaking to TOI, Tomar said, “The NTCA has agreed to consider the idea. We will soon prepare a proposal and seek permission on how many tigers can be shifted. This proposal will be sent to the NTCA and ministry of environment and forests (MoEF) for the final nod.”

Commentary

Indian tiger reserve Ranthambore is doing extremely well with tiger conservation, but suffers many other problems due to their success.

Not only pollution is a major threat within the Ranthambore area, but the Ranthambore tigers are also very fragile as there are no corridors to leave or enter the area.

This not only means a poor gene pool, with more chances on viral diseases, but it also is a magnet for lethal problems.

We have witnessed more incidents than ever, both on the human as on the tiger side. And there is more to come, if there will be no action.

But there is hope. The Indian tiger authority (NTCA) and the state of Rajasthan is looking in to the matter.

#tiger #tigernews

South China tiger

Original source, credits text and photograph

China – Ecns.cn

Pilot national parks make progress in ecological protection.

Content

All of China’s 10 pilot national parks will have finished construction next year, with some parks having made significant achievements in ecological and wildlife protection, the forestry department announced on Thursday.

Since 2015, China has approved the construction of 10 pilot national parks covering more than 20 square kilometers.

In Northeast China Tiger and Leopard National Park, the number of endangered wild animals in the park has witnessed satisfying growth in the past two years, the National Forestry and Grassland Administration said on Thursday.

Both the Siberian tiger and Amur leopard-two species listed as critically endangered in the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s Red List-have seen a population increase, with 10 young baby Siberian tigers and six Amur leopards born during the period, according to Zhang Shanning, deputy head of the park’s management bureau.

Commentary

China is finally making progress with wildlife conservation. The country is doing a pilot with 10 national parks and is already seeing the results.

Keep on going China!

#tiger #tigernews

Alarm bells for tigers

ABOUT THE WRITER

Sagnik Sengupta

ID photo Sagnik Sengupta-02

Sagnik Sengupta is co-founder of SAGE- Stripes and Green Earth. An avid wild life enthusiast, a supply chain professional, also likes to highlight the current scenario in the Indian tiger conservation through articles. Working in various projects under SAGE for improving the socio economic and living conditions of people living around the jungles so that they be a part of the movement to save not only tigers but jungles too. 

 

The IATA Tiger News platform is not only bringing news from other media  but it also provides a platform for people that have an interest in tigers or tiger conservation.

Around 1900 some 100,000 tigers roamed the forests of Asia.  Now only an estimated 4,642 tigers have to live on only 7% of their original habitat.
 
Tigers are facing many threats. We all know about poaching but most people don’t know how the wildlife crime market works. We all know about deforestation but how mining, palm oil and paper & pulp corporations work is a blind spot for most people. We all know about medicines for potency but we don’t have a clue about the Chinese mafia and its relation with Tradtional Chinese Medicines. We know about circuses and zoos but most people don’t know anything about the money and politics involved to maintain the status quo. We know about governments and NGOs involved in tiger conservation but only few people know how hard and difficult conservation really is.
 
Our contributors help you to learn more about tigers and what’s happening with them.
Contributions

India lost 51 tigers in the first five months since January 2019. With jungles & its living beings in the last priority, the days will not be far when we get to see few handfuls of the Royal Cats either in a zoo or in pictures – if still we don’t wake up and start to relook into the entire scenario of tiger conservation.

Indian tigers have been in the crosshair for centuries and every time we hear the news of a tiger death we believe it to be the last incident and wish it not to happen again. The reason behind such expectation is the continuous efforts of the tiger conservation like Save Tiger, Project Tiger and WWF who work round the clock to preserve the endangered species. However, a recent response to National Tiger Conservation Authority (NTCA) states that India has lost 51 tigers have been killed in the territorial fight, poaching or electrocution in the first five months, untill May 29, 2019. On average, the country has lost 10 tigers every month which is half of a total of 102 tigers that were killed in the year 2018. While most of the cases are still under scrutiny as per NTCA website but with reference to on the spot facts – it is seen that almost 40% is due to infighting and another 25% is due to poaching while the rest died natural deaths.

Historical 1411 Tigers Left In India Despite Project Tiger.

The tiger population in India was estimated to be around 40,000 but then it plunged with a count reaching as low as 1411 in the late 2000s. Despite the consistent efforts of the Project Tiger which was started in 1973 in India, there has been a decline in the tiger population with an ever-growing threat of poaching, cannibalism and other reasons.

India is slowly losing the war to save the tigers. According to a recent data available from Tigernet, a database (NTCA),  Madhya Pradesh has remained at the top of the list with about 18 tiger deaths followed by Maharashtra with the deaths of 8 tigers in the first five months of the year 2019. In 80% mortality, the cause of the deaths couldn’t be identified. However, NTCA officials are still investigating the cases.

Some of the cases of tiger deaths over the past five months are mentioned below

Tiger deaths 2019

Tiger Deaths in India Since 2012 - 2018

Below you can find the registered tiger deaths in India.

N – Natural Death
UNP – Unnatural not attributed to poaching ( Including tiger died due to accident, tigers eliminated in conflicts events etc.)
US – Under Scrutiny
P – Poaching  

What To Expect Next?

The future of tigers, with approximately 4,642 remaining in fragmented habitats worldwide, hinges not just on population expansion but also in ‘gene flow’ or the ability of the species to migrate and breed outside their territorial gene pool should be the need of the hour.

Gene flow – both within tiger subspecies and between subspecies separated today by national boundaries – is vital in protecting the existing ‘reserve’ of genetic diversity of this endangered species.

While inbreeding has not yet effected wild tigers, their survival has never been more precarious, their habitat has shrunk to just 7% of historic estimates. Poaching has eliminated a substantial amount of tigers since 2000 worldwide including India and three of the nine subspecies are now extinct – Bali, Javan and Caspian.

The good news is that the Indian subcontinent, which harbours 60% of the world’s wild tiger population, also has significant genetic diversity in the species. But once lost, the reserve genetic diversity will not be regained ‘for million of years, even with higher tiger population’.

 

Genes And Genetic Variation.

The genes of a species hold its history. Tigers once roamed the length and breadth of India, as well as much of the rest of Asia. Historical records chronicling the animal’s slow fall are bound to be incomplete, but the tiger genome adds to the animal story. We will never know for sure how many tigers once lived. We know that at least 80,000 were killed between the latter decades of the 19th and early 20th centuries, their skins proffered to collect bounty payments in British India, but many were also killed for sport.

One Indian prince killed 1,100 tigers within his lifetime — almost half of India’s tiger population today. The drop in tiger numbers in the 19th century was precipitous enough that it shows up in the tiger genome as a bottleneck, roughly two centuries back: wiping out much of the species’ genetic variation, even as tens of thousands were killed due to hunting and habitat loss. When a species comes close to extinction and then recovers, as the tiger is beginning to do, its struggles are still far from over. Genetic variation can take many thousands of years to return to previous levels.

The African cheetah suffered a severe bottleneck roughly 10,000 years ago, and still has low genetic variation as a result. And in the long run, low genetic variation can mean low resilience for a species. Even if the population is doing well at the moment, it lacks the genetic resources to adapt to a changing environment – rather like an individual with a narrow skill set in a fluctuating job market. 

If the winds change, as they always do, being perfectly adapted to yesterday’s environment may turn into a liability.

Genetic Variation Threatens Tiger Reserves, Even Ranthambore.

Thus, the current study’s finding that the tigers of Ranthambore Tiger Reserve in Rajasthan have low genetic variability, in addition to being genetically isolated from tigers in Central and Southern India, is a potential cause for concern. Ranthambore Tiger Reserve is a success story in many respects: its tiger population has grown to such an extent in the last decade that the reserve has started exporting tigers to other protected areas, such as Sariska Tiger Reserve, in order to reduce overpopulation. But a relatively homogeneous gene pool may spell trouble in the long run — both for Ranthambore Tiger Reserve, and reserves like Sariska Tiger Reserve repopulated exclusively with Ranthambore Tiger Reserve’s tigers.

Central India (including the North East) contained the most genetic variation of the three broad genetic clusters identified by the study, with the other two being Ranthambore and South India. However, this storehouse of variation is also under threat, given that tiger reserves tend to be small and physically disconnected, dividing the gene pool into a collection of Noah’s Arks under variable levels of protection. Threats to reserves in Central India include development projects, such as the future widening of National Highway 7 in Kanha and Pench Tiger Reserves, and the forthcoming submergence of Panna Tiger Reserve, all in Madhya Pradesh.

Call For Solutions From Indian Government- Like More Corridors.

One way to encourage the flow of tigers (and therefore genes) across an unpredictable, human-filled landscape is to build wildlife corridors. Such corridors would re-connect populations which are genetically close, and were therefore most likely connected in the recent past.

Since the official estimates that established a 30 per cent increase in the wild tiger population were released in January, many conservationists have repeatedly raised concerns over the government of India’s capacity to manage the increased number of tigers.

With the increase in number of tigers in past four years in India, the tiger density in some of the reserves has surpassed their carrying capacity. Therefore, a good number of tigers have either dispersed or are reported to be living outside the reserves, often coming into conflicts with people or becoming easy targets for the poachers

The government so far did not have a strategy to look beyond the tiger reserves and manage the big cats at a landscape level. But now, with an aim to address this problem, the Indian government’s tiger authority (National Tiger Conservation Authority – NTCA) has come up with a set of guidelines to rehabilitate the tigers that are ‘dispersing’ from the densely populated source forests and bring them to suitable forests with low or no tiger density.

On March 18, the NTCA released a “Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) for rehabilitation of tigers from source areas at the landscape level” and presented it to the Chief Wildlife Wardens of the tiger-range states and field directors of the tiger reserves. The SOP identifies the population clusters with surplus tigers across the country and suggests areas where they can be relocated. The process for relocation has also been mentioned.  

What Guidelines Say.

With the increase in number of tigers in India, there will be several areas where dispersing tigers will move via human-dominated landscapes and at times result in human-tiger conflict… Often, the main reason for the dispersal of tigers is the high density of the source population. It is important to relocate such tigers to areas of low tiger density (or no tigers but have recorded tiger presence in the historical range), which have good habitat and prey populations. However, care needs to be taken to ensure that such relocations are done within population clusters that share a recent common gene pool,” say the guidelines. Based on the current genetic knowledge of tiger populations and the corridor connectivity, the NTCA has identified population with surplus tigers and the areas where tigers can be relocated.

The need of the hour is to relocate tigers from Non Protected Area’s to Protected Area’s where Tiger density is negligible and also from higher density Protected Area’s to Lower Density Protected Area’s. Along with Habitat management and restoration of corridors for free movement of tigers. As the concern are in today’s tiger conservation is increasing no of deaths due to infighting, poaching and human animal conflict

Bangladesh tiger

Original source, credits text and photograph

Bangladesh – Elets Online

Bangladesh - A Treasure Trove Of Biodiversity.

Content

Bangladesh, despites its small landmass and huge population, is endowed with a rich biodiversity. Due to its geographic location, flora and fauna of Indian subcontinent and South-east Asia overlap in Bangladesh as a transitional zone. The fertile delta of the three mighty rives -the Ganges, Brahmaputra and Meghna and their year-round flow combined with monsoon and tropical climate keep the country lush green for most part of the year.

All these factors make Bangladesh’s biodiversity very unique. Table 1 provides a list of faunal diversity of Bangladesh in comparison with neighbouring India–a mega biodiverse country, and the world.

Commentary

Bangladesh is a beautiful country, underestimated by many. It has so much to offer regarding to biodiversity.

One of the crown jewels is the Sundarbans – the worlds largest mangrove forest. And within this beautiful swamp-like area lives the Royal bengal tiger.

#tiger #tigernews

Corbett tiger

Original source, credits text and photograph

United Kingdom – The Telegraph

In search of Jim Corbett's India, a land of pink gin and man-eating tigers.

Content

Mrs Singh emerged from her house brandishing a gun. She raised the rifle, held it against her sari and took aim across the fields. All for dramatic effect. The gun wasn’t actually loaded, she told us as she brought it down. The rifle was used in the past to scare away wild elephants, but it hadn’t been deployed for years – with increasing traffic there were now very few animal incursions, she explained. Besides, she added, the gun was a treasured object. She held it out for us to try.

That was an enormous honour. The rifle once belonged to Jim Corbett, hunter of man-eating tigers, pioneering conservationist and author of compelling jungle tales.

Commentary

Jim Corbett has killed tens of tigers and more than 1200 people.

Despite these horrible numbers Corbett is honored as the person that has put wildlife conservation on the map in India. Not only that, the Indians named a nature park after him. International authorities even named a tiger sub-species after him (Panthere tigris corbetti – commonly known as the Indochinese tiger).

It seems that doing one good thing in life covers all the worse things.

#tiger #tigernews

Plastic for tigers

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – Hindustan Times

Wildlife hit as plastic finds way into parks, reserves.

Content

The death of a Cape Buffalo from eating polythene in the plastic-free National Zoological Park in New Delhi this August not just sent shock waves through the community of environmentalists and wildlife experts, but also raised questions about how clean so-called plastic-free zones, such as national parks, sanctuaries and wildlife reserves, are.

Animals eating plastics is not uncommon. In July, a photograph, shared by a wildlife official, of a leopard eating leftovers in a polythene bag near Corbett Tiger Reserve went viral. In the past, remains of plastic carry bags, gutka packets, and chips and biscuits packaging have been found in elephant dung in the forests of north Bengal.

Commentary

India, like many other countries, has a culture problem. Most people don’t care about their environment enough and throw away their rubbish on the streets.

But not only on the streets. Tourists do it also when they visit national parks or protected tiger reserves.

Local authorities and NGOs do a lot to prevent waste pollution but is seems not enough.

It’s about time that prime minister Modi comes up with a working plan to change the Indian culture – in this sense.

#tiger #tigernews

Rajaji tiger

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – Times of India
Photo credits – The Tribune
 

Rajaji Authorities To Translocate 5 Tigers From East To West.

Content

The officials of forest department have decided to translocate five tigers from the Terai region to Rajaji west in three phases this winter. At present, the eastern part of Rajaji Tiger Reserve, which spans around 30,000 hectares, has around 38 tigers while the west, which is almost double the size, has only 2 tigresses.

RTR director PK Patro said, “The National Tiger Conservation Authority has given the clearance for the move. We are waiting for the soft release enclosure to be constructed after which the animals will be transported to western Rajaji as per the norms.”

Commentary

Five tigers will be relocated from Terai to Rajaji Tiger Reserve, an area with more habitat richness (healthy prey base density, presence of deers, sambhars and leopards along with other species for tiger food.

#tiger #tigernews

Nepal tiger conservation

Original source, credits text and photograph

USA – Science Trends

Bengal Tiger Conservation Using Novel Technologies.

Content

In the Indian subcontinent, Bengal tigers inhabit tropical grassland, riverine, and moist semi-deciduous forests along major river systems. The tiger population in the southern belt of Nepal, often called Terai, is split into three isolated subpopulations that are fragmented by agricultural land and densely-settled human habitats. The largest population lives in the Chitwan National Park and in the adjacent Parsa Wildlife Reserve, encompassing an area of 2,543 km2 (982 sq. mi) of prime lowland forest.

To the west, Bardia National Park and the Shuklaphanta Wildlife Reserve hold the other two tiger subpopulations, well separated from the Chitwan population by one of the growing towns of Butwal.

Commentary

Nepal is using modern techniques to understand more about tigers. It helps with answering the next questions – and more.

How many tigers are there in each of the national parks? How healthy are they from a genetic perspective? Are there any interactions between pockets of tiger populations? Will we be able to track the source of poached tiger parts and help in the fight against wildlife crime?

Interesting development!

#tiger #tigernews

Ratapani tiger

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – Financial Express

Ratapani Tiger Reserve: Madhya Pradesh to get 7th tiger reserve.

Content

Known as the Tiger state of India, Madhya Pradesh is set to get its 7th tiger reserve. The tiger reserve which has been proposed to be carved out of the Ratapani wildlife sanctuary will be known as the Ratapani Tiger Reserve.

A report published in the Indian Express suggested that the declaration was made recently and the central Indian state is inching closer to get a new tiger reserve. It also said that the committee of the state government has submitted a report consisting of the final outline of the core and buffer areas of the tiger reserve that was proposed.

The proposal of the Ratapani tiger reserve has been in government’s shelves for more than a decade, the report added.

Commentary

After 10 years of denying, delaying, and discussing Indian state Madhya Pradesh will finally decide to make Ratapani Wildlife Sanctuary a tiger reserve.

This means more protection for tigers and more possibilities for managing their habitat.

Well done at last Madhya Pradesh!

#tiger #tigernews

Indian tiger

Original source, credits text and photograph

USA – Mongabay

MoEFCC expert committee gives wildlife clearance for Kaiga nuclear plant’s expansion .

Content

Clearing the final hurdle in the expansion of the capacity of the Kaiga Atomic power plant in Karwar area of Karnataka, an expert wildlife panel led by the Indian government’s environment minister Prakash Javadekar has recommended wildlife clearance to it. 

The project related to setting up of pressurised heavy water reactor-based nuclear power plant with installed capacity of 1,400 megawatt (MW) comprising of two units of 700 MW each in the existing premises of 54.09 hectares at Kaiga plant located 1.30 kilometres away from the boundary of the Kali Tiger Reserve got the go-ahead in the meeting of the Standing Committee of the National Board for Wildlife (SC-NBWL) on August 29, 2019.

Commentary

The Indian government meets demands of the NTCA, the Indian tiger authority and is allowed to expand a nuclear power plant, two kilometers away from tiger reserve.

#tiger #tigernews

Nepalese tiger cub

Original source, credits text and photograph

United Kingdom – BBC Discover Wildlife

Title

Content

Nepal’s wild tigers increased to 235 in 2018 from only 121 in 2008 due to the conservation efforts of dedicated local people, the Nepali government and Zoological Society of London (ZSL).

ZSL has been working with communities in Nepal to ensure the survival of the country’s wild tigers for nearly 25 years, empowering and supporting people that live alongside these endangered big cats on the borderlands of the country’s national parks.

Commentary

Nepal is one of the few countries that is making real progress in conservation of nature.

Appreciation goes out to the Nepalese government, that has shown true leadership in making conservation work, in partnership with many small and big NGOs, like ZSL.

#tiger #tigernews

Trapped tiger

Original source, credits text and photograph

United Kingdom – Charity Digital

WWF links up with messaging app for tiger conservation fundraiser.

Content

The WWF (World Wildlife Fund) has launched a digital chatbot and sticker fundraising campaign via instant messaging on mobile phones to help in the global conservation of tigers.

The campaign coincides with global awareness raising event World Animal Day on 4 October and involves the charity linking up with the messaging app Viber.

Through the partnership Viber has created tiger themed stickers that can be downloaded and used within messaging.

Commentary

NGOs in tiger conservation should be worried.

WWF (the World Wide Fund for Nature) is claiming the ‘tiger’ domain more and more, getting more and more grip on donors.

They can build this image tiger saving image because they invest a lot of donor money in building the WWF tiger brand.

Other NGOs should worry because they have more difficulties in getting funding for their activities.

Creating collaborations in order to stay in ‘business’ and to do extremely important activities for tigers seems eminent.

#tiger #tigernews

Avni tiger

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – First Post

Wildlife Week India 2019: Tragic tale of 'man-eating' tigress Avni tells us so much about the climate crisis.

Content

The way that we live on Earth is causing an unprecedented acceleration in species extinction. Now, more than half a million species “have insufficient habitat for long-term survival” and are likely to go extinct unless their natural environments are restored. But we are already seeing major problems from this intrusion, not least through anincrease in human-animal conflict.

A case in evidence is that of Avni, a “man-eating” Indian tigress who achieved something close to global recognition at the end of 2018. Man-eating leopards, lions and tigers aren’t uncommon in India – several are killed or captured annually. But Avni achieved fame when a designer cologne was used in an attempt to lure her into a trap. Sadly, the bait failed and she was ultimately hunted down and killed.

Commentary

Avni was a tigress that allegedly killed humans. She was killed in a very questionable way, with still lots of questions to be answered by the authorities.

This article is not about that. The writer, an associate Oxford professor, takes Avni as an example to demonstrate what global climate change is doing with the world.

Interesting read!

#tiger #tigernews

Tiger

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – First Post

Wildlife Week: India's tiger numbers have increased by 33% in 5 years, but that's not necessarily good news.

Content

It was the late 1960s, when the natural world was in the middle of a deep crisis, that Project Tiger was born.

In 1966, Indira Gandhi had taken over as Prime Minister. It was a time when countless hunting agencies mushrooming across India that enticed hunters from the world over to kill their prize trophy, the tiger. But Indira Gandhi wouldn’t have it, for she had a strong connection with the natural world. By 1968, a ban was implemented on tiger hunting, quickly followed by a ban on the export of skins. The hunter had lost his trophy.

Commentary

Article with an historical view on tigers in India.

The writer ends with saying that tourism will play a vital role and that it should be encouraged.

But the writer is a bit optimistic about the impacs as most profits of tourism is not going to domestic economies but into the pockets of investors. Plus he neglects the side-effects of tiger tourism: waste, noise, and lower reproduction rates.

#tiger #tigernews

Bhutan tiger

Original source, credits text and photograph

USA – Market Business News

Bhutan sets global standard in tiger conservation.

Content

Tiger conservation has reached crisis point worldwide, prompting a need to review management strategies.

Fragmentation of the large carnivore’s habitat, poaching, and loss of prey are worsening the crisis.

At the current rate of decline, experts warn that it won’t be many decades before the tiger is extinct.

A recent study of tiger conservation in the mountainous landscape of Bhutan, however, suggests that all is not lost.

Commentary

This article is about an apparently useless study on conservation of tigers in Bhutan.

Some of the findings:

The researchers found that closeness to protected areas appears to be having a positive impact on tiger habitat use and availability of large prey. Being far away from human settlements also helps.

They suggest that well-managed protected areas can help species recovery and the conservation of biodiversity.

Tiger conservation is more likely to succeed when natural habitats and prey species are protected.

#tiger #tigernews

Pilibhit tigers

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – India Today

Losing Its Stripes | India Today Insight.

Content

If the tiger range states in the country were to organise a party to celebrate the jump in tiger numbers, Chhattisgarh would be one state that would definitely not be getting an invite. While most tiger range states in the country contributed to the increase in tiger numbers from 2,226 to 2,967 between 2014 and 2018, as per the All India Tiger Estimation, 2018, the findings of which were announced by Prime Minister Narendra Modi on July 29 — the central Indian state has emerged as a laggard in this regard. In Chhattisgarh, tiger numbers dropped from 46 in 2014 to 19 to 2018 — making it the only large state that recorded a substantial decline in population.

 

Chhattisgarh has 44 per cent, or 59,772 sq. km, of its landmass under forests. It is the state where the erstwhile ruler of Surguja, Ramanuj Saran Singh Deo, is said to have shot a majority of the 1,1oo (as per some records) or 1,700 (as per other records) odd tigers he did in the 20th century. Till the mid-1990s, tigers were reported 100 km from Raipur and 20 km from Jagdalpur town. But now suddenly they are gone, except sporadic populations in the north, west and southwest of the state.

What really happened?

Commentary

While almost all Indian states with tigers show positive results with regard to numbers, Indian state Chhatttisgarh is not.

There are more reasons to explain this, but the most crucial one is that most of the areas (70%) are not safe for conservationists or rangers because of the presence of left wing extremists.

This is a call for the NTCA and the state government of Chhattisgarh to come up with a viable solution to create a healthy environment for forest guards and conservationists, so they can do their jobs (tiger conservation) properly.

#tiger #tigernews

Sunabeda wildlife sanctuary

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – The New Indian Express

Despite NTCA Nod, Sunabeda Tiger Reserve Hanging Fire.

Content

At a time when Odisha is facing backlash over poor execution of big cat conservation programmes, the State Government is sitting over notifying the Sunabeda Wildlife Sanctuary in Nuapada as a tiger reserve (TR).

The proposed tiger reserve, which was granted in-principle approval a decade back, is facing inordinate delay for reasons best known to the Forest and Environment department.

The National Tiger Conservation Authority (NTCA) has been requesting the State Government to expedite steps to issue final notification for Sunabeda Tiger Reserve at the earliest.

The proposal is pending before the department irrespective of the fact that all formalities required to notify Sunabeda as a tiger reserve were completed by the State wildlife wing earlier this year.

Commentary

Indian State Odish, under fire because of poor tiger protection results, is now again making the news in a bad way.

The Sunabeda Wildlife Sanctuary in Nuapada has everything to become a tiger reserve, where tigers get more protection and attention. It even has the approval of the Indian tiger authority, the NTCA.

But the Odisha government is -again- excelling in poor actions. Now they ‘forget’ to decide to make this sanctuary a tiger reserve.

The reason is why? What other interests are at stake for the people at the government?

#tiger #tigernews

Migrating tigers

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – Deccan Chronicle

Maharashtra Tigers Enter Telangana In Search Of Space, Prey.

Content

A few tigers have migrated to Adilabad and Kumarambheem Asifabad from the Tadoba national park and Andhari tiger reserve in adjacent Maharashtra, especially into the forests of Sirpur (T) Assembly constituency, due to the high number of tigers and less prey base there.

Forest conservation experts say that a tiger migrates in search of new territory when there is a high density of tigers in its area.

Commentary

Because of high density of tigers and lack of prey in certain tiger areas, tigers are now moving into other areas.

People in those areas are not used to tigers so they are afraid.

So there is work to be done by the government!

#tiger #tigernews

Tiger numbers

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – The Telegraph

Whistle-blower Slams Numbers.

Content

India’s tiger conservation programme should shed its obsession with numbers, a researcher instrumental in reviving the big cat population in a Madhya Pradesh forest asserted in Calcutta on Wednesday.

The National Tiger Conservation Authority’s 2018 tiger census report was released by Prime Minister Narendra Modi on July 29. The report showed that the number of tigers in the wild in India has grown to 2,967, a 33 per cent rise since the last count in 2014, which had recorded 2,226 tigers. The rise in the big cat count triggered euphoria.

But conservation biologist Raghunandan Singh Chundawat had a word of caution. “My sarcastic joke is that if the PM had not been releasing it, then what would have been the figure,” he told the audience at Rotary Sadan on Wednesday.

Commentary

The counting of tigers gets too much emphasis, according to a ‘whistle blower’.

We can only agree that it takes the focus away of what really needs to be done!

#tiger #tigernews

Tiger Scouts

Original source, credits text and photograph

Bangladesh – United News of Bangladesh

Tiger Scout Annual Camp-2019 Kicks Off In Khulna.

Content

Speakers at the inagural ceremony of ‘TigerScout Annual Camp-2019’ praised  the young Tiger Scouts who are working for the conservation of tigers and other wild animals in the Sundarbans. 

Md Moyeen Uddin Khan, Conservator of Forests (CF), Khulna Circle opened the camp and acclaimed the young and energetic Tiger Scouts who voluntarily work for the conservation of tigers and other wild animals.

Commentary

In Bangladesh a NGO called WildTeam organizes great initiatives to create a better understanding with locals for tigers.

Now they introduced the Tiger Scouts Annual Camp, where young tiger volunteers learn more about conservation.

Great work guys and girls!

#tiger #tigernews

High altitude tiger
Original source, credits text and photograph
India – The Hindu
Photo credits – International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN)

India, Nepal, Bhutan To Count Tigers In High Altitude.

Content

A study jointly conducted by three countries had established that there were 52,671 sq.km. of tiger habitat in high altitudes or Himalayan habitats of India, Nepal and Bhutan.

With studies earlier this year reporting the presence of tigers in high altitude regions in India, experts from India, Nepal and Bhutan — under the aegis of their governments — will next year begin a detailed assessment on how entrenched tigers are, in these regions.

A study jointly conducted by experts from three countries had, in a report this month, established that there were potentially 52,671 square kilometres of tiger habitat in high altitudes — or Himalayan habitats — of India, Nepal and Bhutan. 38,915 square kilometres of this habitat lay in India.

Commentary

Bhutan, together with Nepal and India, is going to count tigers on high altitude to understand more about their behavior, also in the light of overcrowded tiger habitats due to conservation success.

Scientists believe that tigers can be translocated to high altitude areas as a possible solution for overcrowded tiger habitats.

#tiger #tigernews