Uttarakhand tiger poachers

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – DNA

Forest Dept issues alert for poachers in Uttarakhand.

Content

Uttarakhand Forest Department has issued an alert for poachers in the state. In order to protect the tigers, Nandhaur Wildlife Sanctuary in Haldwani district is being safeguarded by the forest officials. While speaking to media, the Forest Official said, “Our main focus is on tiger poachers and we want that our wildlife sanctuary to be safe and protected.” Tiger poaching has impacted the probability of survival of tigers in India since long time.

Commentary

The forest department of Uttarakhand is warning for poachers, especially in Nandhaur Wildlife Sanctuary.

Please share with people in Uttarakhand!

#tiger #tigernews

Tiger homes

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – ScoopWhoop

In This Battle Of Environment Vs Development, Our Wildlife Is Losing The Fight For Their Homes.

Content

Human beings and wildlife have been co-existing on this planet for centuries. But recent instances of felling of trees in the name of development have put a question mark on the existence of wild animals.

Imagine someone encroaching on your home and destroying it to pieces. It feels terrible, right? Now think of what we are doing to forests and other protected areas where lakhs of wildlife species reside.

Commentary

If you wanna know how India is doing with its wildlife conservation, please read this article.

#tiger #tigernews

TIGERS recognition

Original source, credits text and photograph

USA – Alamosa News

T.I.G.E.R.S earn recognition.

Content

October is Disability Employment Awareness Month.

The School to Work Alliance Program, Blue Peaks Developmental Services, the Work Force Center, the Training Advantage Program and the Colorado Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, recognized three San Luis Valley programs and businesses employing persons with disabilities.

Each were presented with a plaque recognizing their efforts.

Commentary

Another initiative that is really doing good things is using the name of the tiger.

Not a word about the tiger itself, nor the fact that the tiger is an endangered animal – threatened with extinction.

#tiger #tigernews

Bandipur tiger

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – The Hindu

Tiger caught in Bandipur won’t be released back into the wild: official.

Content

The Bandipur tiger tranquillised and shifted to Mysuru won’t be released back into the forest even though it is young and healthy.

This was stated by Principal Chief Conservator of Forests (Wildlife) Sanjai Mohan, who pointed out that since the big cat has killed a person, the authorities cannot take the risk of releasing it back into the wild.

Commentary

Principal Chief Conservator of Forests (Wildlife) Sanjai Mohan is unreliable.

Before the hunt of the Bandipur tiger the intention was to relocate the tiger.

But the second the tiger was captured he announces that the tiger will never be released back into the wild – because of ‘safety of people’.

Instead, look for possibilities. The reason the tiger started eating cows and dogs was because of the loss of a canine tooth – it needed easy prey and humans in the way of it were allegedly killed.

With all the science in the world: just give this tiger a new tooth. There must be plenty in the storage rooms, seized from all the tiger poachers.

And please: stop using elephants for hunting if you are true conservationists.

#tiger #tigernews

Leicester tigers

Original source, credits text and photograph

United Kingdom – Leicester Tigers

Introducing club charity partners for 2019/20.

Content

Leicester Tigers are proud to welcome The Bodie Hodges Foundation and the Leicestershire and Rutland Blood Bikes, alongside the Matt Hampson Foundation as the club’s official charity partners for the 2019/20 season. 

Representatives and volunteers from each of the charities were presented to the Welford Road crowd during Tigers derby day fixture against local rivals Northampton Saints in the final pool game of the Premiership Rugby Cup.

The three charities join the Leicester Tigers Foundation as this year’s charity partners which will see them work with the club to help raise awareness and funds to support their work within the community. 

Commentary

Another sporting club that uses the name of the tiger as their main brand element is Leicester Tigers from the United Kingdom.

Like most of the sporting clubs Leicester Tigers has a foundation to create a warm relationship with its community, often helping people that really need help.

In this case the Leicester Tigers announce three new ‘charity partners’ – all for helping people.

But isn’t it about time to help real tigers – the ones that are endangered and threatened with extinction?

#tiger #tigernews

Budget tiger

Original source, credits text and photograph

Malaysia – New Straits Times

2020 Budget: Mixed reaction to biodiversity allocation.

Content

Budget’s allocation for preserving the environment has drawn mixed reactions from environmentalists and academics.

Malaysian Nature Society (MNS) president Prof Dr Ahmad Ismail commended the government for proceeding with its current fiscal policy of returning 50 per cent of the tourism tax proceeds to the respective states.

He further said the move in Kedah could deter logging in the catchment of Ulu Muda, while encouraging the state to convert the forest reserve into a state park.

“This can also attract ecotourism and create more opportunities for the economy,” he said adding that the forest also provided water to Penang.

Commentary

Like in 2010 during the St. Petersburg Tiger summit Malaysia made big promises: doubling the number of 500 tigers.

Now in 2019 the number of tigers is around 200, which is a decrease of 60 (!) per cent.

The responsible minister – dr. Xavier Jayakumar – made big promises. He said in 2018: “It might sound a bit drastic but if you want to save Malayan tigers, we have to take drastic action as well.”

Only strong words don’t save tigers. Give the people that know what to do the money so they can do it.

If you don’t have the money? Just raise the taxes on palm oil companies: they are the ones responsible for the situation of tigers in the first place.

#tiger #tigernews

Tiger conservation

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – Mid-day.com

'Battle for conservation will be fought in our cities'.

Content

What lessons did research for Rewilding teach you?

For this book, I spent two years travelling to India’s most remote corners; sometimes alone, and at times, with my four-year-old. I covered places from Manas on the border with Bhutan to Orang (Sonitpur district, Assam) a lesser-known park but extremely vital habitat for the rhino and pygmy hog. When I finished my travels I came away with an immense sense of pride on how much we are doing to conserve our wildlife, but this hope sits on the precipice of concern. It takes so much hard work to restore an ecosystem or bring back a species and with just one nod from a decision maker, the same forest can be signed away for a dam or a road. Take the Panna example. While we have an army of forest guards on the ground to protect the tiger in this national park in Madhya Pradesh, we now want to drown the same habitat for a river-linking project. Never mind the millions of rupees that have gone in bringing back tigers to a park that lost all its big cats to poaching.

Commentary

Award-winning environmental journalist Bahar Dutt discusses a new book (Rewilding) that celebrates the lesser-known triumphs of conservation in India, Panna Tiger Reserve and the travesty of Aarey.

Nice interview!

#tiger #tigernews

Ranthambore tiger

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – Times of India

Cramped for space, Ranthambore tigers look for new homes.

Content

The number of tigers in Ranthambore Tiger Reserve (RTR) has increased to the point that the reserve can no longer sustain the big cats that are currently inhabiting the area. Rajasthan’s chief wildlife warden Arindam Tomar has put forward a proposal to the National Tiger Conservation Authority (NTCA), the apex tiger conservation body in the country, to shift the big cats to Mukundra Hills Tiger Reserve (MHTR), Sariska Tiger Reserve (STR) and Ramgarh Vishdhari Wildlife Sanctuary in Bundi.

Speaking to TOI, Tomar said, “The NTCA has agreed to consider the idea. We will soon prepare a proposal and seek permission on how many tigers can be shifted. This proposal will be sent to the NTCA and ministry of environment and forests (MoEF) for the final nod.”

Commentary

Indian tiger reserve Ranthambore is doing extremely well with tiger conservation, but suffers many other problems due to their success.

Not only pollution is a major threat within the Ranthambore area, but the Ranthambore tigers are also very fragile as there are no corridors to leave or enter the area.

This not only means a poor gene pool, with more chances on viral diseases, but it also is a magnet for lethal problems.

We have witnessed more incidents than ever, both on the human as on the tiger side. And there is more to come, if there will be no action.

But there is hope. The Indian tiger authority (NTCA) and the state of Rajasthan is looking in to the matter.

#tiger #tigernews

Tiger hunt on elephants back

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – The News Minute

Three Days On, Tiger In Karnataka's Bandipur That Killed A Farmer Remains Elusive.

Content

The killer tiger in Karnataka’s Bandipur reserve forest continues to elude the state guards as the hunt to capture it entered the third day on Friday.

“No sign of the tiger yet as it does not remain at one place. Hundreds of wildlife tourists visit Bandipur on safari but see a tiger once or twice as they are not easy to spot in a dense forest. We are doing camera trapping to locate it (killer tiger) and the hunt is on,” state’s Principal Chief Conservator (wildlife) Sanjay Mohan told IANS on phone from the forest.

Commentary

It is terrible that a tiger in Bandipur Tiger Reserve in India allegedly killed two humans and that because of that the tiger is now being hunted by the forest department to have the tiger relocated.

What is extra terrible – the forest department that hunts this tiger ared oing so on the back of elephants.

No respect for the elephant whatsoever.

#tiger #tigernews

Corbett tiger

Original source, credits text and photograph

United Kingdom – The Telegraph

In search of Jim Corbett's India, a land of pink gin and man-eating tigers.

Content

Mrs Singh emerged from her house brandishing a gun. She raised the rifle, held it against her sari and took aim across the fields. All for dramatic effect. The gun wasn’t actually loaded, she told us as she brought it down. The rifle was used in the past to scare away wild elephants, but it hadn’t been deployed for years – with increasing traffic there were now very few animal incursions, she explained. Besides, she added, the gun was a treasured object. She held it out for us to try.

That was an enormous honour. The rifle once belonged to Jim Corbett, hunter of man-eating tigers, pioneering conservationist and author of compelling jungle tales.

Commentary

Jim Corbett has killed tens of tigers and more than 1200 people.

Despite these horrible numbers Corbett is honored as the person that has put wildlife conservation on the map in India. Not only that, the Indians named a nature park after him. International authorities even named a tiger sub-species after him (Panthere tigris corbetti – commonly known as the Indochinese tiger).

It seems that doing one good thing in life covers all the worse things.

#tiger #tigernews

Hull City Tiger

Original source, credits text and photograph

United Kingdom – Hull City tigers website

Hull City Supporting World Mental Health Day 2019.

Content

Set up by the World Federation for Mental Health in 1992, the event takes place every year on 10th October with the objective of raising awareness of mental health issues and supporting all mental health stakeholders in their work changing attitudes.

The EFL and their charity partner, Mind, recently launched an awareness campaign for World Mental Health Day 2019, Goals Worth Talking About.

The campaign is the latest activity by the EFL and Mind, who are currently in the second year of their ground-breaking charity partnership which aims to improve the nation’s mental health and wellbeing and the approach to mental health in football.

Commentary

Hull City, a football club in the UK, raises awareness for mental health problems.

We appreciate their efforts, it’s a good cause!

We would appreciate it even more if Hull City Tigers do a lot more on creating better situations for the animal that gave them their name.

The tiger, with only 4,642 left in the wild, is endangered and threatened with extinction.

#tiger #tigernews

Plastic for tigers

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – Hindustan Times

Wildlife hit as plastic finds way into parks, reserves.

Content

The death of a Cape Buffalo from eating polythene in the plastic-free National Zoological Park in New Delhi this August not just sent shock waves through the community of environmentalists and wildlife experts, but also raised questions about how clean so-called plastic-free zones, such as national parks, sanctuaries and wildlife reserves, are.

Animals eating plastics is not uncommon. In July, a photograph, shared by a wildlife official, of a leopard eating leftovers in a polythene bag near Corbett Tiger Reserve went viral. In the past, remains of plastic carry bags, gutka packets, and chips and biscuits packaging have been found in elephant dung in the forests of north Bengal.

Commentary

India, like many other countries, has a culture problem. Most people don’t care about their environment enough and throw away their rubbish on the streets.

But not only on the streets. Tourists do it also when they visit national parks or protected tiger reserves.

Local authorities and NGOs do a lot to prevent waste pollution but is seems not enough.

It’s about time that prime minister Modi comes up with a working plan to change the Indian culture – in this sense.

#tiger #tigernews

Jaime Winstone Mel Blatt tiger advocates

Original source, credits text and photograph

United Kingdom – Hello!

Jaime Winstone and All Saints star Mel Blatt open up about shared passion for tiger conservation.

Content

Actress Jaime Winstone and All Saints star Mel Blatt have spoken about their passion for tiger conservation in their bid to save the endangered animals. Inviting HELLO! to join them on a train trip on the Eastern & Oriental Express from Bangkok through Thailand, Malaysia and Singapore, Jaime said she was shocked by the rapid decline in the number of tigers in the world.

There are now only 3,900 tigers living in the wild globally, compared to more than 100,000 in the early 20th century. If no action is taken, they could be extinct within a decade. “It’s very daunting. It’s in your face and it hits home more when you see it with your own eyes,” says Jaime, mum to three-year-old Raymond with her partner James Suckling. “The thought of my son growing up and asking: ‘What’s a tiger, Mummy, do they just live in zoos?’ is really depressing.

Commentary

UK actress Jaime Winstone and All Saints star Mel Blatt talk about tigers on a fancy train trip.

#tiger #tigernews

Pretty Boy tiger

Original source, credits text and photograph

United Kingdom – The Times

Three stripes and you’re out: Pretty Boy the tiger doomed after killing third villager in Rajasthan.

Content

He is among the most beautiful wild tigers in the world. But Pretty Boy has become one of India’s most notorious man-eaters after killing three villagers, and is now at the centre of a battle over whether he should be caged for life — or put down.

“The animal was growing normally, leaving its mother and hunting prey, but it turned killer,” according to Andy Rouse, a British photographer who has taken pictures of Pretty Boy, 3, in Ranthambore National Park in Rajasthan since he was a cub.

Commentary

Another Ranthambore tiger that is a victim of the failing Rajasthan state wildlife policy is Pretty Boy.

Pretty Boy is a beautiful tiger but due to the unavailability of sufficient habitat it needs to go out of human set boundaries. While doing so this tiger thinks it has to protect its habitat against introducers, not knowing humans also live there. This already led to three human casualties.

The problem behind this lays within the success of the past wildlife policy of Rajasthan: due to this success many tigers were able to succesfully reproduce. That’s wonderful.

On the other hand, due to the commercial success of Ranthambore the area got hust too many people and business so Ranthambore is not able to expand to host the growing amount of tigers – as is necessary.

So too many tigers, not enough space to live and too many people… well, you can do the maths yourself.

In this case Pretty Boy was tranquilized again (for the 6th time) and removed to a 2-hectare facility as it allegedly killed three humans.

But more Pretty Boys will follow if Rajasthan doesn’t change its policy soon.

#tiger #tigernews

Tiger road kill

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – OnManorama

Explained | Why people in Wayanad protest traffic ban through Bandipur Tiger Reserve?

Content

Protests have been raging in Kerala’s Wayanad district to lift the night traffic ban on the 19-km
stretch of the National Highway-766 passing through Bandipur Tiger Reserve.
 
The hunger strike by leaders of various political parties entered 12th day on Sunday. On October 1, thousands of students and farmers went on a protest march in solidarity with the hunger strike. The agitation hogged national headlines when Congress leader and Wayanad MP Rahul Gandhi visited the protesters and offerred them support on Sunday.
 

Commentary

People protest against a night traffic ban and some even do a hunger strike. Why? The night traffic ban afffects their life: they have less time to get to work or school or to go home.

The Indian Supreme Court already ordered to create an alternate road. Even though protests go on.

People suspect that lobbyists of interest groups like ginger, resort, havala, gold, merchandise and religions are behind the protests.

#tiger #tigernews

Tiger selfie

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – Republic World

SHOCKING: Ranthambore Reserve Officers Click Selfie With Dead Tiger,

Content

In a blatant display of insensitivity, a video has emerged on Saturday, of forest officials of Ranthambore Tiger Reserve clicking selfies with a dead tiger in Rajasthan’s Sawai district. The three-year-old male tiger T-109 or ‘Veeru’ died on Thursday, after succumbing to his injuries incurred in a fight allegedly over forest territory, according to ANI.

The Reserve staff had reportedly performed last rites for ‘Veeru’ at Aama Ghat in Sawai Madhopur on Friday. The video shows a uniformed officer posing for a self with Veeru’s body as staff watch. Then officials are seen picking up the tiger’s remains to perform his last rites.

Commentary

Taking a selfie with a tiger is not done. Many people are condemned for it, but they do it in roadside zoos, tiger tourism facilities in Thailand, China or the USA.

But why do you – as an uniformed official in a tiger reserve – make a selfie with a dead tiger?

It is a sign of total disrespect, which adds up to everything that is happening in Ranthambore right now.

[see the video in the article]

#tiger #tigernews

Awareness sessions on tigers

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – The Hitavada

Nova Nature Society conducts awareness programmes on Wild Life Week.

Content

On the occasion of Wild Life Week 2019, Nova Nature Society conducted mass awareness programmes where members from society held interactive sessions at schools and colleges on issues including snake bite, status of tigers, elephants and wild buffalo in State with the people.

Commentary

Nova Nature Society is raising awareness on wildlife with mass programs on schools.

A.o. they talk about snakes and snake bites (50,000 a year in India) and about the situation of tigers.

Well done and keep up the good work!

#tiger #tigernews

Canadian tiger pets

Original source, credits text and photograph

Canada – News Optimist

3,600 lions and tigers being kept as pets in Canada.

Content

Wild cats are fascinating creatures, from afar. But according to a new survey, more than 3,600 lions and tigers are estimated to be kept as pets in Canada. In fact, 1.4 million exotic pets are estimated to exist in the country including Burmese pythons and African grey parrots.

These new data show a harsh reality for exotic animals facing a life in captivity. And it’s all legal. For example, if you’re in Ontario, your neighbour could have a tiger and you may not even know it.

Commentary

A survey of World Animal Protection in Canada shows that Canadian citizens have 3,600 tigers and lions as pets.

It is time to change this Canada!

#tiger #tigernews

Airbnb

Original source, credits text and photograph

USA – Peta

Big News! Airbnb Experiences Ban SeaWorld, Elephant Rides, Tiger Cub Petting, More.

Content

After working with PETA, international hospitality company Airbnb announced the launch of new policy guidelines governing its Animal Experiences, which ban direct-contact activities that abuse and exploit wild animals!

Airbnb Experiences are bookable tours and activities, designed and led by local experts. While Airbnb has excluded elephant rides from its tourism experiences for some time now, the new policy prohibits other encounters that cause animals harm, such as swimming with dolphins and photo ops with tiger cubs.

Commentary

Peta has worked together with Airbnb to make new guidelines.

These guidelines mean that Airbnb will ban direct-contact activities that abuse and exploit wild animals!

Another big step!

#tiger #tigernews

Trapped tiger

Original source, credits text and photograph

United Kingdom – Charity Digital

WWF links up with messaging app for tiger conservation fundraiser.

Content

The WWF (World Wildlife Fund) has launched a digital chatbot and sticker fundraising campaign via instant messaging on mobile phones to help in the global conservation of tigers.

The campaign coincides with global awareness raising event World Animal Day on 4 October and involves the charity linking up with the messaging app Viber.

Through the partnership Viber has created tiger themed stickers that can be downloaded and used within messaging.

Commentary

NGOs in tiger conservation should be worried.

WWF (the World Wide Fund for Nature) is claiming the ‘tiger’ domain more and more, getting more and more grip on donors.

They can build this image tiger saving image because they invest a lot of donor money in building the WWF tiger brand.

Other NGOs should worry because they have more difficulties in getting funding for their activities.

Creating collaborations in order to stay in ‘business’ and to do extremely important activities for tigers seems eminent.

#tiger #tigernews

Tiger

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – First Post

Wildlife Week: India's tiger numbers have increased by 33% in 5 years, but that's not necessarily good news.

Content

It was the late 1960s, when the natural world was in the middle of a deep crisis, that Project Tiger was born.

In 1966, Indira Gandhi had taken over as Prime Minister. It was a time when countless hunting agencies mushrooming across India that enticed hunters from the world over to kill their prize trophy, the tiger. But Indira Gandhi wouldn’t have it, for she had a strong connection with the natural world. By 1968, a ban was implemented on tiger hunting, quickly followed by a ban on the export of skins. The hunter had lost his trophy.

Commentary

Article with an historical view on tigers in India.

The writer ends with saying that tourism will play a vital role and that it should be encouraged.

But the writer is a bit optimistic about the impacs as most profits of tourism is not going to domestic economies but into the pockets of investors. Plus he neglects the side-effects of tiger tourism: waste, noise, and lower reproduction rates.

#tiger #tigernews

Pilibhit tigers

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – India Today

Losing Its Stripes | India Today Insight.

Content

If the tiger range states in the country were to organise a party to celebrate the jump in tiger numbers, Chhattisgarh would be one state that would definitely not be getting an invite. While most tiger range states in the country contributed to the increase in tiger numbers from 2,226 to 2,967 between 2014 and 2018, as per the All India Tiger Estimation, 2018, the findings of which were announced by Prime Minister Narendra Modi on July 29 — the central Indian state has emerged as a laggard in this regard. In Chhattisgarh, tiger numbers dropped from 46 in 2014 to 19 to 2018 — making it the only large state that recorded a substantial decline in population.

 

Chhattisgarh has 44 per cent, or 59,772 sq. km, of its landmass under forests. It is the state where the erstwhile ruler of Surguja, Ramanuj Saran Singh Deo, is said to have shot a majority of the 1,1oo (as per some records) or 1,700 (as per other records) odd tigers he did in the 20th century. Till the mid-1990s, tigers were reported 100 km from Raipur and 20 km from Jagdalpur town. But now suddenly they are gone, except sporadic populations in the north, west and southwest of the state.

What really happened?

Commentary

While almost all Indian states with tigers show positive results with regard to numbers, Indian state Chhatttisgarh is not.

There are more reasons to explain this, but the most crucial one is that most of the areas (70%) are not safe for conservationists or rangers because of the presence of left wing extremists.

This is a call for the NTCA and the state government of Chhattisgarh to come up with a viable solution to create a healthy environment for forest guards and conservationists, so they can do their jobs (tiger conservation) properly.

#tiger #tigernews

Tiger temple

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – Times of India

Tiger Zone In Andhra Pradesh Faces Threat From Ashram Expansion Plan.

Content

The Varikuntla tiger corridor zone in Kadapa, one of the last few homes left for the big cat in Andhra Pradesh , is under threat not from forest dwellers or poachers, but from an old ashram, which has now applied for diversion of around 13 hectares.

The tiger zone connects Gundla Brahmeswaram (GBM) wildlife sanctuary to Seshachalam forest, and experts say the expansion of the ashram is a serious threat to the tigers, specially when camera traps set up in the area clicked two tigers in the area recently.

An alarmed National Tiger Conservation Authority has sent a notice to AP forest department, asking why huge structures, including ashram rooms, choultry and a temple is being allowed, leading to deforestation.

Commentary

Another temple is screwing tigers, this time in India.

In Indian state Andhra Pradesh the management of a temple has encroached precious land from a tiger corridor and wants to have even more tiger habitat to expand their temple complex to host the thousands of visitors they receive every month.

We say: build a temple in a village or in a city but leave the tigers alone. Also we say: demolish the possibly illegally built buildings.

#tiger #tigernews

Amur pixel tiger

Original source, credits text and photograph

United Kingdom – Unilad

Photos Of Species Made Up Of As Many Pixels As There Are Animals Still Alive.

Content

Population by Pixel, shows how close animals are to extinction by how pixelated they are. The images are made up of as many pixels as there are animals left of that particular species.

It was created by agency Hakuhodo C&D / Tokyo and was the brainchild of creative directors Nami Hoshino, Yoshiyuki Mikami, and designer Kazuhiro Mochizuki.

Commentary

What happens if you create a photograph of wild animals based on their numbers?

This article shows how photographs look like if their resolution in pixels is in accordance with their numbers in the wild.

#tiger #tigernews

Rajib Naskar tiger conflicts

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – Outlook

In Sundarbans, Rajib Naskar Risks His Life To Prevent Man-Tiger Conflicts.

Content

Driven by unfathomable poverty and need, the villagers living near the Sundarbans often illegally venture into the forests to fish and catch crabs, becoming easy prey for the big cats.

Deep inside the mangrove forest of the Sundarbans in West Bengal, Rajib Naskar stood just ten metres away from a male tiger that was glaring at him. Naskar had nowhere to run. And yet, miraculously, he survived to tell the tale.

Rajib is a forest guard in the Sundarbans. His job includes regular foot patrolling in the dangerous mangrove forests which is the territory of the ferocious Sundarban tiger and putting up fences on the edge of the forest to prevent any man-tiger conflict.

Few places in the world are as perilous as the Sundarbans.

Commentary

Forest guards are the unknown heroes of conservation. Some even risk their lives every day to protect the forests where endangered animals, like tigers, live.

This article is about Rajib Naskar, a forest guard in the Indian side of the Sundarbans – the largest mangrove forest in the world.

#tiger #tigernews

Tiger Scouts

Original source, credits text and photograph

Bangladesh – United News of Bangladesh

Tiger Scout Annual Camp-2019 Kicks Off In Khulna.

Content

Speakers at the inagural ceremony of ‘TigerScout Annual Camp-2019’ praised  the young Tiger Scouts who are working for the conservation of tigers and other wild animals in the Sundarbans. 

Md Moyeen Uddin Khan, Conservator of Forests (CF), Khulna Circle opened the camp and acclaimed the young and energetic Tiger Scouts who voluntarily work for the conservation of tigers and other wild animals.

Commentary

In Bangladesh a NGO called WildTeam organizes great initiatives to create a better understanding with locals for tigers.

Now they introduced the Tiger Scouts Annual Camp, where young tiger volunteers learn more about conservation.

Great work guys and girls!

#tiger #tigernews

Tiger Day

Original source, credits text and photograph

Europe – Euronews

Vladivostok Celebrates 'Tiger Day'.

Content

Children wearing yellow and orange t-shirts, adults carrying orange balloons and park rangers in tiger-print SUVs all took part in an annual parade to raise awareness of the plight of the Amur tiger, which is on the brink of extinction.

Amur tigers, also known as Siberian tigers, mainly live in Russia’s the Far East, northeast China and northern parts of the Korean Peninsula. It is one of the world’s most endangered species, with less than 500 believed to remain in the wild, only around 20 of which in China.

Commentary

This is how you celebrate Tiger Day!

Vladivostok in Russia was the stage where a massive crowd raised awareness on tigers.

In Russia they celebrate Tiger Day on the 29th of September. And they do it well!

Well done Russia!

#tiger #tigernews

Tiger on World Animal Day

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – State Times

‘Save The Animals, Save The World’: JK Public School Panjtirthi Celebrates World Animal Day.

Content

JK Public School (JKPS) Panjtirthi on Friday celebrated World Animal Day to appreciate and acknowledge human’s relationship with the animals.

Surekha Bajju commenced the celebration by saying, “Each and everyone of us can help to make this world a fairer place for all animals.”

She added, “The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated.”

Commentary

Like us, this school just celebrates World Animal Day when it wants – unlike the world that only celebrates on the 4th of October.

Kids have dressed like animals to raise awareness on the sorry state of the animal kingdom.

Like the children and this school: for us it is always World Animal Day!

#tiger #tigernews

Tiger numbers 2019

Tiger Numbers 2019 - Devil In Disguise.

Content

(Rotterdam, The Netherlands) – 25th of September 2019

After praising India for showing great results in tiger conservation, the new number of wild tigers has been revised to 4642, based on available data, said Chris Slappendel, founder of the IATA Tiger News Platform.

The new numbers are compiled from the latest national tiger surveys, IUCN data and realistic estimations from reliable sources. Compared with 2010 – a major moment in tiger history when in St. Petersburg (Russia) countries, NGOs, IGOs committed to doubling the amount of tigers to 6,400 – this new number of wild tigers is a big step forward. The current increase can be attributed to the fast growing tiger population in India. However, the rising numbers distract from what is really happening on ground level.

“Since 2010 we see the same things happening as before. Agriculture (palm oil), mining and encroachment are leading to destruction of tiger habitat. International operating crime syndicates are inducing the Chinese demand for tigers and tiger products, and use tiger farms to deliver the supply while fuelling the demand for tigers in the wild. Unsustainable tourism is expanding with more exploitation of tigers in captivity and more unwanted situations in and around tiger reserves,” said Frederic Geffroy, founder of Planete Tigre, a tiger NGO in France, with almost nine hundred thousand worried followers.

The situation of tigers has worsened if looked beyond the new numbers. Cambodia, Vietnam and Laos failed in executing the plans agreed during the St. Petersburg Tiger Summit, resulting in a situation where tigers are ‘functionally extinct’. Malaysia expects to announce the results of their recent census soon but an estimated number of 200 tigers shows that Malaysia has lost around 60 (!) per cent of its tigers since 2010. Myanmar’s tiger population suffers greatly from domestic instability, with a growing influence of wildlife trade hubs serving mainly Chinese customers, as well as in Laos and Vietnam.

The situation in Sumatra (Indonesia) is a mystery. In 2010 a number of 325 tigers was presented but this appeared to be an estimated guess. Like Malaysia, Indonesia invested heavily in palm oil development in recent years, resulting in an ongoing destruction of tiger habitat. Sources on the ground however indicate that, at this moment, the real number of tigers is closer to 500. So while the situation has worsened, the ‘official’ number of tigers will grow when the results of the next census of Sumatran tigers will be presented.

Even in an apparently successful country like India, things are not what they seem. While the census shows a great success, the reality is that India has the most human-tiger conflicts, the most seized tiger products and the highest poaching numbers of all tiger range countries, according to the recently published report of TRAFFIC, an international watchdog on wildlife crime. The government of India has received also lots of criticism on the methods used with the latest tiger census.

“What we can learn from the last nine years is that not all governments are reliable when it comes to tiger conservation. This needs to change drastically. The world needs a governing vehicle that can step up when things don’t go according to plan, like in Vietnam, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia and Cambodia. The UN seems to be the most logical organization but the UN needs to see tiger conservation as a priority. The World Bank, key-initiator of the St. Petersburg Tiger Summit, left the stage without a decent transfer of its role and commitment. CITES is only interested in regulating the trade and is generally considered as a ‘paper tiger’. Next to the UN there is only one organization that can do it, which is WWF. But unfortunately WWF is under constant questioning and criticism from lots of other NGOs,” says Slappendel who refers to the new numbers as a devil in disguise.

“People who read that the numbers are going up, really think it’s getting better. But it is not. Despite all the help of NGOs, volunteers, law enforcers and all others that work hard to make a better world for tigers. If we want to save tigers, the world needs to do more”, Slappendel concludes.

Commentary

Now India has released its new tiger numbers, we now can say that the new total number of tigers in the wild has increased to 4642 tigers.

Although we’re extremely thankful with this development, we’re very worried at the same time. The situation of tigers outside of Bhutan, India, Nepal, and Russia is either unknown or just poor, just because governments are not keeping their promises.

The new tiger number of 4,642 is therefore not representing what’s really happening on ground level. We call it a devil in disguise.

We call for much more action, not only from the tiger range countries but from all other countries, international organizations, people and companies – especially the companies that now use a tiger in its brand or marketing without doing anything to save tigers.

#tiger #tigernews

Frederic Geffroy, Planete Tigre

Frederic Geffroy

Founding president of Planete Tigre, a French NGO.

Chris Slappendel

Chris Slappendel

Founder of the IATA Tiger News platform and chairperson of the Wildlife Advocates Foundation, a Dutch NGO.