Panna tigers

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – The Better India

0 to 54: The Untold Story of How Panna Got Her Tigers Back in Just 10 Years.

Content

In 2009, there were no tigers left in Panna Tiger Reserve. What happened in the next 10 years is really heartwarming at a time when the world’s tiger population is under a serious threat. #WildIndia #Respect

Set up in 1981, Panna National Park, Madhya Pradesh became a tiger reserve in early 1994. Fifteen years later, in 2008, Panna’s official tiger count stood at a shocking zero.

The revelation created a public furore, with forest department officials facing a nationwide backlash. They stood dejected; the damning statistics shattered their morale. The state committee set up to probe into the matter suggested the transfer of all the existing forest officials at Panna. But IFS officer R Sreenivasa Murthy, the newly instated Director of Panna Tiger Reserve, opposed the move, stating that the current officials already possessed a hands-on knowledge of Panna and her tigers. 

Commentary

Panna Tiger Reserve in India had lost all its tigers in 2008. But due to perseverance, understanding the local tribes and conservation and cooperation with government and NGOs, the reserve is back on track. And how!

Nowadays more than 50 tigers roam in Panna Tiger Reserve.

A job well done and an example for many countries!

#tiger #tigernews

tiger academician Ma Jianzhang

Original source, credits text and photograph

China – Xinhua Net

Legend of China's "tiger academician" .

Content

Dubbed “tiger academician”, Ma Jianzhang, the 82-year-old academician of China Engineering Academy, had his first encounter with wild Siberian tiger in 1960s, which opened a new chapter in his career focusing on the study of the endangered species.

From 2013 to 2018, wild individual Siberian tigers have been observed a total of 57 to 62 times in China, compared to 12 to 16 tigers in 2000.

In 2017, China established its first national park for Siberian tigers and Amur leopards. Spanning an area of over 1.46 million hectares in the provinces of Jilin and Heilongjiang, the park is scheduled to be completed in 2020.

Commentary

One of China’s leading tiger conservationists is the 82-year old Ma Jianzhang.

He is interviewed in this article, which gives rare insights on Chinese tiger conservation.

#tiger #tigernews

Tiger tooth

Original source, credits text and photograph

Thailand – Khaosod

Rare Birds, Animals Under Threat From Amulet Craze, Campaigners Warn.

Content

Craze for helmeted hornbill heads as amulets and decorations is posing a serious to the birds’ small population in Thailand’s forests, conservation activists said Monday.

The campaigners spoke at an event where they announced a new campaign to raise awareness over the dwindling number of rare animals in the wild. They were joined by celebrities and government officials who urged Thais to eliminate the use of animal parts, such as hornbill heads, tiger teeth, and ivory.

While ivory and tiger teeth have long been targeted by poachers, a recent fad for helmeted hornbill in the black market is particularly worrying because there are only about 200 hornbills left in Thailand, according to an activist from environment group Traffic.

Commentary

250,000 people in Thailand own artifacts made from tigers. More and more people think it’s cool to have some too – but campaigners warn about it.

Luckily, a revised version of the Wildlife Protection Act in Thailand will come into effect in late November. People who get busted after it can get up to 10 years in jail and/or get a fine up to 1 million baht (around 32,000 US dollars).

#tiger #tigernews

Indian tiger

Original source, credits text and photograph

USA – Mongabay

MoEFCC expert committee gives wildlife clearance for Kaiga nuclear plant’s expansion .

Content

Clearing the final hurdle in the expansion of the capacity of the Kaiga Atomic power plant in Karwar area of Karnataka, an expert wildlife panel led by the Indian government’s environment minister Prakash Javadekar has recommended wildlife clearance to it. 

The project related to setting up of pressurised heavy water reactor-based nuclear power plant with installed capacity of 1,400 megawatt (MW) comprising of two units of 700 MW each in the existing premises of 54.09 hectares at Kaiga plant located 1.30 kilometres away from the boundary of the Kali Tiger Reserve got the go-ahead in the meeting of the Standing Committee of the National Board for Wildlife (SC-NBWL) on August 29, 2019.

Commentary

The Indian government meets demands of the NTCA, the Indian tiger authority and is allowed to expand a nuclear power plant, two kilometers away from tiger reserve.

#tiger #tigernews

Pilibhit tigers

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – India Today

Losing Its Stripes | India Today Insight.

Content

If the tiger range states in the country were to organise a party to celebrate the jump in tiger numbers, Chhattisgarh would be one state that would definitely not be getting an invite. While most tiger range states in the country contributed to the increase in tiger numbers from 2,226 to 2,967 between 2014 and 2018, as per the All India Tiger Estimation, 2018, the findings of which were announced by Prime Minister Narendra Modi on July 29 — the central Indian state has emerged as a laggard in this regard. In Chhattisgarh, tiger numbers dropped from 46 in 2014 to 19 to 2018 — making it the only large state that recorded a substantial decline in population.

 

Chhattisgarh has 44 per cent, or 59,772 sq. km, of its landmass under forests. It is the state where the erstwhile ruler of Surguja, Ramanuj Saran Singh Deo, is said to have shot a majority of the 1,1oo (as per some records) or 1,700 (as per other records) odd tigers he did in the 20th century. Till the mid-1990s, tigers were reported 100 km from Raipur and 20 km from Jagdalpur town. But now suddenly they are gone, except sporadic populations in the north, west and southwest of the state.

What really happened?

Commentary

While almost all Indian states with tigers show positive results with regard to numbers, Indian state Chhatttisgarh is not.

There are more reasons to explain this, but the most crucial one is that most of the areas (70%) are not safe for conservationists or rangers because of the presence of left wing extremists.

This is a call for the NTCA and the state government of Chhattisgarh to come up with a viable solution to create a healthy environment for forest guards and conservationists, so they can do their jobs (tiger conservation) properly.

#tiger #tigernews

Amrabad tiger

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – Times of India

Telangana Forest Dept Against Chopping 15,000 Trees In Amrabad Tiger Reserve For Highway.

Content

While chief minister K Chandrasekhar Rao on Sunday assured on the state assembly floor that his government will not give permission for uranium mining in Nallamala forest, the environmentalists are now demanding the government not to give permission for the expansion of the national highway.

The Telangana Forest Department is against the cutting of around 15,000 trees for expansion of National Highway that passes through the Amrabad Tiger Reserve. As the user agency, National Highway Authority of India (NHAI) started marking the trees that are likely to be chopped off for expanding the road.

Commentary

The Telangana forest department opposes the killing of 15,000 trees for a road.

Logical.

#tiger #tigernews

Tiger Temple dead tiger

Original source, credits text and photograph

USA – The Washington Post

These Tigers Were Rescued From An Infamous Tourist Attraction. Then 86 Died In Government Custody.

Content

At Thailand’s infamous Tiger Temple, paying tourists could pet and pose for selfies with the dozens of big cats that called the attraction home. They could walk tigers on leashes and bottle-feed cubs. But the Buddhist monastery turned tourist magnet had for years faced allegations of abuse and, in 2016, a raid by Thai authorities uncovered ghastly sights, including 40 frozen tiger cubs shoved into a refrigerator and a monk attempting to flee with 1,600 tiger parts.

The government soon removed 147 tigers from the compound in the West Thailand town of Kanchanaburi, taking them to two state-run facilities. But in a tragic update on the case, Thai media reported Friday that 86 of the rescued animals have died. A government official attributed the animals’ deaths to a viral disease, saying their immune systems had been compromised by inbreeding.

Commentary

Tiger Temple, once famous for its monks caring for tigers, but later unmasked for tiger trade, strikes again.

Already 86 out of 147 seized tigers have died due to a viral disease while being in Thai government custody.

Some NGOs points fingers to the Thai government for not taking proper care for the seized animals.

Although that is partly true, the real blame is with the exploiter of Tiger Temple: abbot, Phra Wisutthisarathen. He was responsible for Tiger Temple and is responsible for breeding tigers. He is responsible for these deaths and a shame for buddhism.

This dramatic mass killing calls for stronger regulations by the Thai government on tiger exploiting facilities, like Sri Racha Tiger Zoo, Tiger Temple and others alike.

We call for a national discussion in Thailand on tiger tourism to prevent further unnecessary harm to tigers.

#tiger #tigernews

Negara tigers

Original source, credits text and photograph

source

Raising Apex Predators At Zoo Negara.

Content

Zookeeper Umar Ashraf, 32, fixed his eyes briefly on the Malayan tiger cubs, Wira, Hebat and Melur, who could not stop hissing and roaring at him. He continued to point a water hose around their enclosure.

The cubs’ mother, Kayla, who temporarily moved to a nearby enclosure for the clean-up, was upset. She roared loudly, displaying her fangs in a show of protest.

Read the original article here.

Commentary

Zoo Negara in Kuala Lumpur in Malaysia is exploiting tigers to overcome their financial problems.

The director already spoke out recently that he wants to breed more cubs. Also he wants to make interaction with people possible to attract more people. The reason? The zoo is losing visitors fast as more and more people don’t want to go to zoos anymore.

The interviewed zookeeper said zoos around the world, including Zoo Negara Malaysia, played a role in education and animal conservation.

What he should say is that zoos around the world were responsible for stealing the worlds most fantastic wildlife from its habitat.

#tiger #tigernews

tiger management

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – The Hitavada

Management Weakness Hits Tiger Conservation.

Content

The Management Effectiveness Evaluation (MEE) of Tigers in India 2018 report has pointed out human settlements, hunting and illegal felling among others as the major management weakness hindering the conservation efforts in the Tiger Reserves of Chhattisgarh, which resulted in downfall in the tiger population. In the recent tiger estimation report, the tiger population in Chhattisgarh slumped from 46 to 19.

The radical decline in the population of the national animal has come as a major jolt to the Forest Department of Chhattisgarh. Some of the most common management weakness in ATR, USTR and ITR are as following: hamlets inside the core and buffer areas of the reserves, which are hindering management process. Almost all the tiger reserves are lacking in patrolling vehicles and insufficient wireless handsets to maintain communication between the field staffers.

Commentary

The state of Chhattisgarh in India fails miserably in managing their tiger reserves. The result: poachers can do what they want.

The tiger numbers dropped from 46 to 19.

This most be a big priority for the NTCA, the Indian Tiger authority.

And for prime minister Modi, who obviously wants to use tigers to boost the status of the government. Well, here is another chance.

#tiger #tigernews

Kerinci tiger habitat

Original source, credits text and photograph

USA/Indonesia – Mongabay

A Tiger Refuge In Sumatra Gets A Reprieve From Road Building.

Content

The rainforests that once carpeted Indonesia’s Sumatra Island are among the world’s most biodiverse ecosystems, home to iconic species like the Sumatran tiger, rhino and orangutan. They are also among the most imperiled; in just two decades, between 1990 and 2010, Sumatra lost 40 percent of its old-growth forest. The tigers, rhinos and orangutans that roamed those forests are now critically endangered.

Much of the intact forest that remains is protected, at least nominally, in a series of National Parks, and, since 2004, as a UNESCO World Heritage Site known as the Tropical Rainforest Heritage of Sumatra (TRHS).

Commentary

Indonesia has to do so much more to save its top tiger reserve Kerinci Seblat.

This article gives an excellent insight on how a beautiful nature area is being wasted by agriculture, logging, mining and poaching.

Please step up Indonesia!

#tiger #tigernews

Bangladesh tiger

Original source, credits text and photograph

Bangladesh – Dhaka Tribune

Tigers Under Threat.

Content

It is worrisome that despite widespread concern regarding the preservation of the Bengal Tiger in the Sundarbans, their population has barely increased since 2015, rising from 106 to 114.

This should come as no surprise, considering the fact that according to a recent report by Traffic — a global wildlife trade watchdog associated with the World Wildlife Fund and the International Union for Conversation of Nature — the rate of tiger poaching and trafficking has continued to rise, with 37 tigers found killed by poachers between 2000 and 2018.

Commentary

Call from Bangladesh newspaper Dhaka Tribune on the Bangladesh government to prioritize the conservation of the Bengal tiger in the Sundarbans.

It calls for action: “We must rectify these problems immediately, and punish to the full letter of the law anyone who tries to harm these precious creatures for personal gain.”

Grass tiger

Original source, credits text and photograph

India – Down To Earth

Bihar’s Valmiki Tiger Reserve To Get More Grassland Cover.

Content

Click edit button to change this text. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus,  nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.

Commentary

The grassland cover of India’s Valmiki Tiger Reserve (VTR) is set to increase.

The move will help in better managing the habitat for prey animals, crucial to the survival of tigers.

Well done VTR!

Bangladesh tiger

Original source, credits text and photograph

Bangladesh – The Daily Star

Tiger Poaching On Rise.

Content

More than three tigers were poached in Bangladesh every year over the last four years, according to a report published by TRAFFIC, a UK-based international non-profit working on trade in wildlife and plants.

Although Bangladesh has only a few tigers in the Sundarbans, the trend of poaching for tiger skin, teeth, bones, skulls, and other parts of tiger body is increasing, said the report published on Wednesday.

It said 51 tigers were killed over the last 20 years and the average for 2015-18 is 3.1 tigers, which is a lot higher than that of 2000-2014 when it was 2.0.

Commentary

TRAFFIC, an international NGO that monitors the wildlife trade, came with a report, claiming that Bangladesh lost 3,1 tigers on average during the last 19 years – which is a lot higher than that of 2000-2014 when it was 2.0.

Officials concerned in Bangladesh, however, denied TRAFFIC’s claims and said poaching numbers and seizures of tiger body parts were reducing.

Do these officials know that Bangladesh had 440 tigers in the 2010 count and now only have 114?

Trafficked tigers

Original source, credits text and photograph

United Kingdom – The Independent

At Least Two Dead Tigers Seized Each Week From Smugglers Threatening Big Cats’ Future, Study Says.

Content

More than two carcasses of endangered tigers are being seized every week from smugglers who are driving the big cats towards extinction, research has found.

Officials in 32 countries discovered 2,359 dead tigers between 2000 and last year – a number described as a “conservative” estimate.

Commentary

“Year on year, it’s more bad news for tigers” says Kanitha Krishnasamy, director with TRAFFIC who did a study to trafficked tigers.

Each week 2 dead tigers are seized – only the tip of the iceberg.

Since the year 2000 until last year 2,359 dead tigers were seized, in only 32 countries.

Unclear is how many tiger seizures China had.

Mixed emotions tiger

Original source, credits text and photograph

USA – The Daily Beast

A Jungle Walk On Tiger Safari Is An Emotional Roller Coaster.

Content

Chinmay Deshpande pointed to a patch of wet brown earth. “See that?” said the naturalist with Pugdundee Safaris. He kneeled down to get a better look, and sniffed. The damp spot was urine from a tiger. He had peed right where we stood, on a leafy remote trail in India’s Satpura National Park, perhaps not an hour before. As for specifics, the tiger was almost certainly male because of his massive footprints, which were the size of dinner plates.

Judging by its fresh urine, the stealthy predator was probably still around, close by in the dense sal and teak forest.

Depending on your perspective, this was either fantastic—we might see a tiger in the wild as we crept in the jungle, as opposed to the usual perch of an open-air jeep.

Commentary

Feel good story of a writer walking in tiger territory and experiencing all kinds of emotions in Indian tiger reserves.

Dhaka zoo tiger

Original source, credits text and photograph

Bangladesh – Dhaka Tribune

Is Bangladesh Going To Fail In Doubling Tiger Population?

Content

Due to the wildlife hunting and trafficking, illegal trade of wildlife, deforestation and environmental catastrophe, not only tigers but other wild animals also became endangered in the world. Considering the situation, the tiger range countries (TRC), including Bangladesh, in 2010 at the Tiger Summit in Russia, decided to double the number of tigers in their respective countries by 2022. 

According to the forest department, the number of tigers in Bangladesh has increased by eight in the last three years, which is only 8%. At the same time, the number of tigers in India has increased by 741.

Now the question is: “Is the Bangladesh Forest Department going to fail to achieve the desired goal of increasing the tiger population within a certain period?”

Commentary

Bangladesh fails in doubling the tiger numbers, as agreed upon in 2010.

The reasons are obvious but the excuses come as the year 2022 is getting closer.

Fences tigers

Original source, credits text and photograph

Times of India

Nagpur: Forest Boundaries To Be Fenced To Check Man-Animal Conflict.

Content

In a bid to tackle man-animal conflict, the state cabinet on Tuesday approved setting up of chain link fencing at the boundaries of forests near sensitive village blocks.

Forest minister Sudhir Mungantiwar said he also proposed Rs 50 crore in the 2019-20 budget for the plan. “There was a demand from local leaders and other public representatives to address the man-animal conflict ,” he said.

The project will be implemented in vulnerable villages by extending the ambit of the Dr Shyama Prasad Mukherjee Jan Van Yojana which is already in place in tiger corridors and buffer zones of the reserves in Maharashtra.

Commentary

Pilot-like initiative in Indian reserve where fences will be placed to protect villagers against tigers.

Wonderful news!

Tigers AI

Original source, credits text and photograph

United Kingdom – BBC

Title

Content

Researchers in the United States have developed AI software which can predict where poachers are operating. The PAWS programme, created by a team from the USC Viterbi School of Engineering, has led to around 20 times more snares being discovered in the Srepok Wildlife Sanctuary in Cambodia. It’s hoped this could eventually make it possible for tigers to be reintroduced to the park.

The software is due to be gradually rolled out in hundreds of national parks across the globe in the coming months.

Commentary

In the coming months software with artificial intelligence (AI) will be distributed to hundreds of national parks across the globe.

This software can predict where poachers are operating.

The PAWS Programme was created by the USC Viterbi School of Engineering, an elite part of USC – the University of South California.